Zane heads down to sunny Melbourne to check out the majorly updated Suzuki V-STROM 1050, check out what he thought of the Standard and new DE models... Photos: Suzuki Aus, TGB

V-STROM fans asked, Suzuki delivered. The majorly updated V-STROM 1050 and the new 1050DE, which phases out the 1050XT, sees the most off-road capable machine that has ever graced the line-up. I took off to Victoria to see how it handled on and off-road riding.

Zane has been out in Victoria testing out the 2023 Suzuki V-STROM 1050 range. Check out what he thought!

Zane has been down in Victoria testing out the 2023 Suzuki V-STROM 1050 range. Check out what he thought!

I need to stop prefacing these stories with “I’m not and adventure rider”. Truth be told, I’m way more confident off-road than I lead on, partially from needing to test a few adventure machines while Jeff has been out of action and partially from years of riding enduro loops as a kid/teenager. That being said, I still get nervous at the thought of muscling a heavy bike around on loose-surfaces but the 2023 V-STROM 1050DE has plenty of features to increase my confidence.


Want to know more? Brush up on your V-STROM history here…


Suzuki Australia have opted to bring both of the 1050 models Down Under, the 1050 standard and 1050DE. Despite the miniscule price difference between the two and the serious improvement over the standard model, Lewis Croft from Suzuki assured me there’s still a market for the road-centric model, especially for the V-STROM nuts out there. The new DE model will eliminate the current V-STROM 1050XT from the Australian market.



Check out our 2020 V-STORM 1050XT review here…


I flew to Melbourne to check out Suzuki Australia’s HQ and the updated models. Rocking up to see all the new V-STROM 1050’s was an exciting visual, the model has come a long way since its introduction in 2002, especially in the styling department.

All the new V-STROM 1050's and 1050DE's lined-up out the front of the Suzuki Australia HQ!

All the new V-STROM 1050’s and 1050DE’s lined-up out the front of the Suzuki Australia HQ!

The long beak, which has become a staple for the V-STROM range, the tall seat, the high ‘bars, the motocross inspired rear end and the crash bars (standard on the DE) accentuate the route that Suzuki have mapped out for the V-STROM range, to become a go-anywhere machine. I cannot stress enough how well the Champion Yellow No.2 suits this bike. It’s seriously such a cool colour. The favourite among the other journos is the Pearl Vigor Blue. I still prefer the Yellow.



The standard 1050 features similar equipment but eliminates everything you wont need on the road: no bash plate, no crash bars, cast wheels (smaller front wheel too), narrower handlebars, rubber footpegs, less travel front and rear, less ground clearance and no “Gravel mode” for the TCS! It’s still a trick looking bike but everything about the DE makes it look so much more aggressive and improves the over-all styling.

The two new-generation models are the V-STROM 1050 and the harder-edged V-STROM 1050DE, which will go on sale in Australia by March 2023.

The Standard 1050 (on the right) features: no bash plate, no crash bars, cast wheels (smaller front wheel too), narrower handlebars, rubber footpegs, less travel front and rear, less ground clearance and no “Gravel mode” for the TCS!

I opt to spend most of the launch on the DE model due to off-road sections being plentiful on our ride to and beyond Marysville, and of course I choose the Champion Yellow No.2 machine. Suzuki did ask if I wanted the low seat put on but I opted for the standard seat since I’m 184cm tall. What I did opt for is the removal of the rubber inserts on the footpegs, maximum amount of boot grip is always a perk while off-road. All it takes to remove them is two allen-key bolts and they slip right out, leaving you with a super aggressive footpeg!



Throwing a leg over the V-STROM 1050DE for the first time and I seriously nearly fall over to the other side. Not only is the seat a lot higher than it first appears but the centre of gravity is high! It’s not an issue while moving but it’ll easily catch people off-guard while moving slowly or coming to a stop until they get used to the balance. It’s typical for an adventure bike.

Hitting the road on the new V-STROM 1050DE and we are met with this super roomy rider triangle.

Hitting the road on the new V-STROM 1050DE and we are met with this super roomy rider triangle.

Time to hit the road and I’m super eager to hit the loose stuff, however ahead of us we had about an hour or two of road riding where we all got acquainted with the touring side of the V-STROM 1050DE. The comfort levels from the tall seat, roomy seating position, high handlebars and plush suspension made for one of the nicest rides through traffic I’ve had in a long time. Lane-splitting is a little nerve-wrecking due to that high centre of gravity, but lots of rear brake and plenty of clutch slip at low-speed seems to help manage the weight.



The rest of our ride out to Marysville is off-road, so it’s time to see if the plunge into a more off-road heavy approach pays off for Suzuki. First thing to do is to stop and switch the DE to gravel mode, full power and ABS off, then the bike transforms into this easy to ride off-roader.

The Gravel mode TCS sees an added level of safety for riders who want some intervention out on the loose stuff.

The Gravel mode TCS sees an added level of safety for riders who want some intervention out on the loose stuff.

The gravel mode is the real star of the show, for road riders looking to make the switch to an adventure bike it’s a really good way to ease yourself into tackling some loose surfaces. The traction control allows for plenty of rear wheel slip in a controlled fashion. As I go flat-pelt on the throttle, I can see the TCS light flashing on the dash but the rear wheel spinning just enough to have some fun.


The gravel mode is the real star of the show, for road riders looking to make the switch to an adventure bike it’s a really good way to ease yourself into tackling some loose surfaces…


Compare this to a conventional road TCS system on the dirt and it’s night and day, road modes cut in to the point where it’s nearly dangerous. It’s awesome to know there’s that extra level of protection there, especially when you get a little heavy handed on the throttle around the corners.



The suspension is spectacular, the fully adjustable 43mm KYB USD forks perform extremely well off-road straight out of the box, Suzuki Australia made zero adjustment before the launch. There is plenty of front-end feeling without a harsh rebound, you can tell Suzuki have put plenty of development into off-roading with it. I can’t think of a single thing that would need to be changed about the front forks in-terms of loose surfaces.


“The suspension is spectacular, the fully adjustable 43mm KYB USD forks perform extremely well off-road straight out of the box…”


The shock sees a similar fate, it’s almost perfect. The KYB remote shock, which is only adjustable for preload and rebound, loves soaking up the harsh bumps without back breaking rebound. After riding for a while standing up, I sat down along the off-road section and cruising along at 110km/h was a breeze.

The 1050DE has such a comfortable suspension setup that sitting down while riding on rocky surfaces is no problem.

The 1050DE has such a comfortable suspension setup that sitting down while riding on rocky surfaces is no problem.

The DE features spoked wheels with a 21in front wheel and 17in rear, the 21in front tracks through the loose surfaces with confidence. That added rolling diameter helps the stability beyond belief, given that dirtbikes have had a 21in front wheel for years, I’m surprised to see Suzuki adopting this size so late.

2022 Suzuki V-STROM 1050DE.

The V-STROM 1050DE finally receives a 21in front wheel, further cementing its position off-road…

I know there are reservations of a 21in front wheel’s performance on the tarmac, but the V-STROM 1050DE just sails through the corners. Chasing the boys who were on the road V-STROM 1050s, I could keep up through the twisties with little issue. The only thing I’m not a particular big fan about is that narrow width, a 90 width front tyre is scary on the road and my brain is constantly telling me not to lean the 1050DE over too far! But if off-road riding is your thing, it’s not going to be an issue for you.



The Dunlop Trailmax hoops leave less than to be desired off-road. The tread design is very mild, so the rear wheel struggles to hook up in the dirt, even with the Gravel mode helping it along. Front end grip could be seriously improved off-road with an all-round tyre like the Pirelli Scorpion STR. The floaty nature of such a mild off-road tyre meant it wasn’t clearing all the debris while off-road, hitting soft gravel lost a heap manoeuvrability at the front and plenty of traction at the rear.


Kawasaki

The front not being tubeless could cause you some strife out in the middle of nowhere too, instead of just being a simple patch kit when you hit a spikey rock, it’s a tube-replacement. You should probably practice your mobile tube-replacements if you’re planning on doing some hard riding.

Those Dunlop Trailmax hoops tackle the road fine, but I would definitely opt for a more aggressive tyre if you're looking to hit more loose surfaces. There are plenty of awesome options out there now...

Those Dunlop Trailmax hoops tackle the road fine, but I would definitely opt for a more aggressive tyre if you’re looking to hit more loose surfaces. There are plenty of awesome options out there now…

It’s very uncharacteristic of me to leave it this late to mention the powerhouse. It’s the same working formula that Suzuki have followed for nearly three decades at this point, the 1037cc V-twin is the same at the core as the V-twin seen on the TL1000 from 1997! Granted that Suzuki have put some serious development into improving just about every aspect of it, they’re following the simple rule: if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.



Power is unchanged for 2023, 106hp@8500rpm and 100Nm@6000rpm. What Suzuki have done is add electronic throttle-bodies and a quickshifter. Right off the bat, everything about the RbW throttles improves the overall ride and power delivery, it allows for a much more accurate TCS and cruise control, which pretty much doesn’t move more than 1km/h faster or slower the whole time it is set.

Standing up on the footpegs can make it fatiguing on the wrist to continuously grab the clutch to change gear, the quickshifter does away with that and allows you to rattle up and down the gears with minimal effort. It improves the ride way more than expected.

Standing up on the footpegs can make it fatiguing on the wrist to continuously grab the clutch to change gear, the quickshifter does away with that and allows you to rattle up and down the gears with minimal effort.

The quickshifter, while notchy at times, completely changes the way the bike performs off-road. Standing up on the footpegs can make it fatiguing on the wrist to continuously grab the clutch to change gear, the quickshifter does away with that and allows you to click up and down the gears with minimal effort. It improves the ride way more than expected.

Suzuki have included all the accessories you'd normally chuck on a V-STROM with the 1050DE. It's awesome to see a sump guard, crash bars and knuckle guards straight from the factory.

Suzuki have included all the accessories you’d normally chuck on a V-STROM with the 1050DE. It’s awesome to see a sump guard, crash bars and knuckle guards straight from the factory.

In the highest power mode, the engine mapping down low is a little hard to manage, the torque isn’t as smooth as you’d want it to be while on loose surfaces. That being said, switching to a lower power mode really improves that low-rpm rideability, however that torquey nature of a V-twin does still linger.

The power output of the V-twin is very linear on the road, the tyres hook up to allow for a smooth ride all through the rev-range.

The power output of the V-twin is linear on the road, the tyres hook up allowing for a smooth ride through the rev-range.

On the road is a different story, the V-twin is no-longer amplified by the amplified forces of a loose road. The V-STROM 1050 loves to be revved out to the redline and that torque is much more manageable, namely thanks to the tyres hooking up on the tarmac. The torque is easily to handle at low-speeds with that improved throttle feeling, thanks to the RbW. With the peak power coming on at 8500rpm, it feels uncharacteristic of a conventional V-twin, the speed really sneaks up on you and it’s all a very linear experience throughout the rev-range.



The overall ergonomics of the 2023 V-STROM 1050DE are perfect, as mentioned previously you have so much room on the bike, long hauls and cross-country type travel would be spectacular on this thing. I can’t remember the last time I jumped off a bike after doing hours of off-roading and didn’t feel sore. Even while standing up, the 1050DE’s wide and tall ‘bars don’t put any strain on your wrists. I don’t even think I’d need some ‘bar risers if I owned one…


“The overall ergonomics of the 2023 V-STROM 1050DE are perfect… you have so much room on the bike, long hauls and cross-country type travel would be spectacular on this thing.”


The switchable ABS is also new for 2023. ABS just does not handle loose surfaces well at all so I can’t believe the option to switch it off has been this long-coming. The ABS will automatically switch back on when you shut the bike off, which is a positive so you’re not riding around on the tarmac without it but it can be a pain when you forget to switch it back off before you set off. You cannot change the ABS or TCS while on the move.



All of this is controlled via the 5in TFT screen. Everything on the dash is right in-front of you, it’s not confusing and you don’t have to muck around trying to set up before your ride, simply just click up and down on the assists you want to change. The TFT is placed so you can see it while standing up but a vertical stacked dash, seen on other adventure bikes, would allow for a clearer view while standing.

Scorching along on the dirt! The new V-STROM is a far cry from the first generation.

Scorching along on the dirt! The new V-STROM is a far cry from the first generation.

The brakes have plenty of grab on the discs while out on the road, you’ll have no issues coming to a halt with those massive twin 310mm discs on the front. The trade off is a real lot of brake power off-road which could take some getting used to… A very strong initial bite will surely catch a few new V-STROM riders off-guard. The rear brake is flawless, everything about the lever pressure to the amount of brake it applies makes the bike so easy to ride at low-speeds.



I have to address the top-heaviness of the V-STROM 1050DE. The machine weighs in at a whopping 252kg (5kg more than the 2022 XT) and it feels like most of that weight sits high up. Coming to a stop on it and the bike feels like it wants to tip over.

Despite the V-STROM 1050DE weighing in at a whopping 252kg, the weight does drop away once you're on the move. Traveling at slow speeds is where you really start to feel it.

Despite the V-STROM 1050DE weighing in at a whopping 252kg, the weight does drop away once you’re on the move. Traveling at slow speeds is where you really start to feel it, it’ll catch you out the first few times you ride it.

The weight did catch me out once when doing a u-turn on the dirt, hitting a rock and the bike decided it wanted to tip over. Luckily, the other blokes were around to steady me back up as I don’t doubt that if the bike had fallen and squashed my leg, I would’ve been trapped.



The sump guard is standard on the 1050DE. If you know anything about the 1000 and 1050 V-STROM’s, you’ll know why they need them. The oil filter sits right at the bottom of the engine, prime position to be taken out by a flying rock or even just a high obstacle. You can hear it putting in the work as rocks and debris ricochet off the guard.

Much of what has been said about the 1050DE can be applied to the road model bar a few things. The standard 1050 handles slightly different on the road due to its smaller front wheel, less suspension travel and lower seat.

Much of what has been said about the 1050DE can be applied to the road model bar a few things. The standard 1050 handles slightly different on the road due to its smaller front wheel, less suspension travel and lower seat.

Much of what has been said about the 1050DE can be applied to the road model bar a few things. The standard 1050 handles slightly different on the road due to its smaller front wheel, less suspension travel and lower seat. The seating position does feel slightly more cramped compared to the DE but still handles the awful Australia roads with ease.



The road models got through the off-road sections but the lack of “Gravel” mode and smaller cast front wheel made a lack of difference on-road but a world of different off-road. Tipping it into the corners on the road provided a little more confidence as the 110 width front tyre has more contact patch and thus providing more lean angle.

"Considering the standard model comes in at only $1700 less than the DE, I can’t see a reason why you wouldn’t go with the DE."

“Considering the standard model comes in at only $1700 less than the DE, I can’t see a reason why you wouldn’t go with the DE. It completely trumps the standard model off-road and pretty much matches it on-road.”

Considering it comes in at only $1700 less than the DE, I can’t see a reason why you wouldn’t go with the DE. It completely trumps the standard model off-road and pretty much matches it on-road, in fact, the DE is actually more comfortable on long-hauls thanks to its suspension travel increase.



The 2023 Suzuki V-STROM 1050DE and 1050 have made me stop saying “I’m not much of an adventure rider.” The DE has inspired way more confidence in my ability to ride a heavy bike off-road. Sure, it has its downfalls, but at $22,990 rideaway for the standard and $24,690 rideaway for the DE, I’m not sure what else performs this well at that price in this category. It’s damn good value for money.

"At $22,990 rideaway for the standard and $24,690 rideaway for the DE, I’m not sure what else performs this well at that price in this category. It’s damn good value for money."

“At $22,990 rideaway for the standard and $24,690 rideaway for the DE, I’m not sure what else performs this well at that price in this category. It’s damn good value for money.”

Check back in at the end of the month when I get back from the launch of the all-new V-STROM 800DE in New Zealand to see which one I’d prefer more!


CFMOTO 450MT


2023 Suzuki V-STROM 1050/DE Tech Talk

The two new-generation models are the V-STROM 1050 and the harder-edged V-STROM 1050DE, which will go on sale in Australia by March 2023.

The new 1050DE model will replace the outgoing XT version as a more off-road centric option for customers.


ENGINE

The 2022 V-STROM 1050/DE is powered by the latest iteration of Suzuki’s distinctive liquid-cooled, four-stroke, 90° V-twin DOHC engine. Notable changes include the introduction of Suzuki’s Bi-directional Quick Shift System and an update to the transmission.

The 2022 V-STROM 1050/DE is powered by the latest iteration of Suzuki’s distinctive liquidcooled, four-stroke, 90° V-twin DOHC engine.

The 2022 V-STROM 1050/DE is powered by the latest iteration of Suzuki’s distinctive liquid-cooled, four-stroke, 90° V-twin DOHC engine.

The engine design provides perfect primary balance, with each of the two cylinders cancelling out the vibration of the other. This eliminates the need for any balancer shafts, preventing the mechanical loss associated with them, and this connects to improving thermal efficiency for higher power output. Because each cylinder is independent, each can be optimised to facilitate the use of dual-plug heads.



The V-STROM 1050/DE is the first Suzuki motorcycle to employ hollow sodium-filled exhaust valves. They help reduce temperature in the combustion chamber.


Existing Engine Features

  • Dual Spark Technology which utilises two iridium spark plugs per cylinder.
  • Optimised exhaust and intake cam profiles combine with cam timing to provide combustion efficiency that contributes to high power output, low fuel consumption and Euro 5 emissions standard compliance.
  • The cylinder bores inside the aluminium die-cast cylinders are plated using Suzuki’s SCEM process.
  • Highly-rigid, lightweight forged pistons engineered using FEM (Finite Element Method) analysis.
  • Each of the two cylinders is fed by independent 49mm large bore electronic-controlled throttle
    bodies.
  • 2-into-1 exhaust system.

The updated six-speed transmission adopts a high-geared first and sixth gears that make shifting into second, and from there through fifth gears, smoother. The updated gear ratios also combine well with the operation of the new Bi-directional Quick Shift system.

The updated six-speed transmission adopts a high-geared first and sixth gears that make shifting into second, and from there through fifth gears, smoother.

The updated six-speed transmission adopts a high-geared first and sixth gears that make shifting into second, and from there through fifth gears, smoother.

Suzuki Clutch Assist System (SCAS)
The slipper clutch partially disengages when downshifting to decelerate to mitigate the effect of engine braking. The assist function leverages precision-engineered ramps to force the clutch boss and pressure plate together and efficiently transfer torque to the rear wheel under acceleration, all while using softer clutch springs.

The slipper clutch partially disengages when downshifting to decelerate to mitigate the effect of engine braking.

The slipper clutch partially disengages when downshifting to decelerate to mitigate the effect of engine braking.

Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (S.I.R.S.)
The Suzuki Intelligent Ride System (S.I.R.S.) features a collection of advanced electronic rider assist systems. Check all of them out below…


S.I.R.S. electronic systems employed by the 2022 V-STROM 1050/DE

  • Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (SDMS)
  • Suzuki Traction Control System (STSC)
  • Cruise Control System
  • Ride-by-Wire Electronic Throttle System
  • Bi-directional Quick Shift System
  • Suzuki Easy Start System
  • Low RPM Assist
  • Combined Brake System
  • Motion Track Brake System
  • Slope Dependent Control System
  • Load Dependent Control System
  • Hill Hold Control System.

Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (SDMS) fully leverages Suzuki’s electronic throttle control system to offer a choice between three modes that deliver different power output characteristics.


  • Mode A (Active): provides the sharpest throttle response at low to mid-range speeds and reaches the top of its power curve at lower rpm.
  • Mode B (Basic): reaches the same level of maximum output, but features a more linear curve with softer throttle response at low to mid-range speeds.
  • Mode C (Comfort): provides the softest throttle response and more gentle torque characteristics, while delivering power in a linear fashion that eventually reaches the same level of maximum power output at high rpm.

Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (SDMS) fully leverages Suzuki’s electronic throttle control system to offer a choice between three modes that deliver different power output characteristics.

Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (SDMS) fully leverages Suzuki’s electronic throttle control system to offer a choice between three modes that deliver different power output characteristics.

Suzuki Traction Control System (STCS)
The higher number the mode, the faster the control takes effect and the more proactive the system is in limiting wheel spin. As such, Mode 1 is for sport riding with minimal intervention from the system. Mode 2 offers a balance that is ideal for city riding and regular road conditions. And Mode 3 is well suited to wet or otherwise slippery road conditions. The system is programmed to continuously monitor front and rear wheel speed, engine RPM (as calculated using data from the crank position sensor), throttle position and gear position. It is designed to immediately limit power and help prevent slipping when an imminent loss of traction is detected by retarding the ignition timing and limiting the throttle opening.

New G (Gravel) mode (V-STROM 1050DE only)
In addition to the 3 modes (+ OFF) of STCS, the V-STROM 1050DE introduces a new Gravel (G) mode setting that retards ignition timing to help the rider better negotiate gravel roads by allowing some slip when riding on unpaved surfaces.

Ride-by-Wire Electronic Throttle System
Suzuki’s electronic throttle control system takes advantage of the 32-bit ECM to control the action of the throttle valves. Throttle grip action is set to be slightly stiffer on the 2022 V-STROM 1050/DE, particularly when first opening the throttle.



 

Cruise Control System
Updated settings for the 2022 V-STROM 1050/DE allow the speed to be set when riding in 2nd gear or higher at engine speeds between 2,000rpm and 7,000rpm, which translates to vehicle speeds of roughly 25km/h to 160km/h. The handy resume function re-engages the system and accelerates to the most recent speed setting after cancelling.

ABS unit
The V-STROM 1050/DE is equipped with a new Anti-lock Brake System (ABS) unit from Bosch that is even more compact and lighter in weight than the unit it replaces. Working in conjunction with the IMU, the ABS unit realizes features such as the Motion Track Brake System, Slope Dependent Control System, Load Dependent Control System and Hill Hold Control System

For 2022, the Suzuki VSTROM gets an updated frame with rigidity and strength kept in mind.

For 2022, the Suzuki VSTROM gets an updated frame with rigidity and strength kept in mind.


CHASSIS
The twin-spar aluminium alloy frame for the V-STROM 1050/DE incorporates aluminium castings along with extruded aluminium sections that lend the right amount of suppleness and strength to an overall rigid alloy frame structure.The result is a lighter, stronger frame. The frame’s updated seat rails add battery and rear fender mounting brackets that better support the input load from unpaved surfaces.



 

The V-STROM 1050DE gets its own dedicated chassis geometry with a longer wheelbase, longer rake, more ground clearance and a wider handlebar grip. The purpose is to improve stability and controllability when riding on unpaved surfaces.

Specifically, the V-STROM 1050DE adopts a longer swingarm to offset the larger front tyre and lengthened front suspension.



 

Optimised front and rear suspension
Fully adjustable KYB inverted front forks with 43mm diameter inner tubes deliver a smooth, controllable ride. The spring preload and compression/rebound damping can be adjusted, allowing the suspension to be set to best match the rider’s preference or the usage conditions.



The link-type mono-shock KYB rear suspension contributes to agility and stability. In addition to adjustable damping force and spring preload, the rear suspension’s preload can be adjusted by simply turning the dial by hand.

The front and rear suspension spring rate, valve, and piston settings were custom-tuned for the
V-STROM 1050DE to maximise performance and comfort when riding on unpaved surfaces.
Updates to the front and rear suspension also see a longer 170mm front fork suspension
stroke and an extended 168mm of rear wheel travel.



The V-STROM 1050DE rides on wire-spoked wheels and adopts a 21-inch aluminium front rim which is wrapped in a 90/90-21 Dunlop TRAILMAX MIXTOUR tyre in the front and 150/70R17 Dunlop TRAILMAX MIXTOUR tyre in the rear.

The V-STROM 1050DE adopts wider (20mm per side) new tapered handlebars made from thicker tubing and a softer grade aluminium than the V-STROM. The 1050DE seat features a fixed-height design with a new bottom shape.



 

V-STROM 1050DE adopts an aluminium engine protector as well as new side and centre stands designed to match the taller ground clearance of the VSTROM 1050DE’s custom chassis geometry.



A custom new 5-inch full-colour TFT LCD multi-function instrument panel features a clearly legible display of a rich variety of information.

The V-STROM 1050 will be available in a single livery – Metallic Reflective Blue/Metallic Matt Black – and retail for $22,990 ride away some time this month!



There’s a choice of three two-tone liveries on the V-STROM 1050DE – Champion Yellow/Metallic Matt Sword Silver, Pearl Vigor Blue/Pearl Brilliant White or Glass Sparkle Black/Metallic Matt Black – and the premium model will go on sale for $24,690 ride away, as landing this month. 



Yamaha 2


2023 Suzuki V-STROM 1050 [1050DE] Specifications

www.suzukimotorcycles.com.au

Price: $22,990 [$24,690] Ride Away
Warranty: Two years/unlimited kilometre
Colours: Metallic Reflective Blue/Metallic Matt Black  [Champion Yellow/Metallic Matt Sword Silver, Pearl Vigor Blue/Pearl Brilliant White or Glass Sparkle Black/Metallic Matt Black]
Claimed power: 79kW [106hp]@8500rpm
Claimed torque: 100Nm@6000rpm
Fuel capacity: 20L


Engine: 90-degree V-Twin, liquid-cooled, four-stroke, DOHC, four-valves, 1037cc, EFI
Gearbox: Six speed
Clutch: Wet multiplate slipper
Final drive: Sealed chain


Chassis: Twin-spar aluminium frame
Rake: 25.4 degrees, Trail: 110mm [27.3 degrees, 126mm trail] Suspension: Fully adjustable 43mm KYB USD forks, KYB remote shock, preload and rebound adj, 160mm travel
Brakes: Dual Tokico radially mounted four-piston calipers, 310mm rotors, single 260mm rear rotor and Nissin caliper, combined braking system, cornering ABS
Wheels & Tyres: 17in tubeless spoked alloy rims, 110/80-19 – 150/70-17 tyres. [Wire wheels, 90/90-21MC and 150/70-17MC]


DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 1555mm [1595mm] Seat height: 855mm [880mm] Overall length: 2265mm [2390mm] Height: 1515mm [1505mm] Width: 940mm [960mm]


Instruments & Electronics: 5in TFT dash, ABS, Cruise, Traction Control, LED Lights, Ride Modes, Hill Hold, S.I.R.S


Editor’s Note: If you are reading this article on any website other than BikeReview.com.au, please report it to BikeReview via our contact page, as it has been stolen or re-published without authority.


MNA
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