Peter has been testing out the new MotoPressor Pocket Pump V2 from Pro Accessories. Check out what he thought of this now essential piece of riding kit that'll save you some strife...

Some older BMW models came complete with a tyre repair kit and even a hand pump. Stuff like this can get you out of serious trouble when you’re stuck out in the middle of nowhere. Now there’s an even better option than the hand pump, the MotoPressor Pocket Pump V2!

Some older BMW models came complete with a tyre repair kit and even a hand pump. Now there's an even better option than the hand pump, the MotoPressor Pocket Pump V2!

Some older BMW models came complete with a tyre repair kit and even a hand pump. Now there’s an even better option than the hand pump, the MotoPressor Pocket Pump V2!

The old hand pump came in useful when a mate of mine and I were stuck out the back of nowhere in Queensland (which has a lot of back-of-nowhere) on his R 60 with a flat tyre. Ever since then I have carried a basic tyre repair kit on my bikes whenever I went anywhere near the back of nowhere. Of course I have never had any use for it, because as we all know, carrying a tyre repair kit stops bikes getting flat tyres.

Yeah, that’s nice to believe but not necessarily true. Even in the age of tubeless tyres, there will still be an occasional flat, if not yours then one of your mates or that of a stranger stuck by the side of the road.

The MotoPressor Pocket Pump V2 comes with everything you need to pump up your tyres on the fly while being compact enough to pack on the bike!

The MotoPressor Pocket Pump V2 comes with everything you need to pump up your tyres on the fly while being compact enough to pack on the bike!

Tubeless tyres have made the job of fixing flats much easier, and there are several convenient methods of patching the hole; the choice is yours. When it’s patched, however, the tyre still needs so be refilled. While you can use a hand pump (strenuous) or CO2 cylinders (fiddly) I prefer an electric pump. Until recently, I carried a MotoPressor Pocket Pump, but that has been retired in favour of this new item from the same supplier.

The MotoPressor Pocket Pump V2 does not look like its predecessor, which rocked a kind of cyberpunk aesthetic. The V2 has a slick housing instead, and while it is smaller and lighter it is just as powerful. It still pumps over 130psi and will inflate a 150/70 R18 tyre from zero to 31psi in three minutes. All with a weight of 345g and size of 100x74x35mm.

The V2 still pumps over 130psi and will inflate a 150/70 R18 tyre from zero to 31psi in three minutes. All with a weight of 345g and size of 100x74x35mm.

The V2 still pumps over 130psi and will inflate a 150/70 R18 tyre from zero to 31psi in three minutes. All with a weight of 345g and size of 100x74x35mm.

It has a cooling fan and comes complete with an inflation hose and a two-metre power cord fitted with an SAE connector. There’s also an SAE-equipped set of alligator clips if you don’t have an SAE connector on the bike. All this fits in a neat zipped and padded pouch.

One thing the V2 does not have is a pressure gauge. Instead, there is a pressure checking valve. Just attach your tyre pressure gauge (you do carry one, don’t you?) to this to, er, check the pressure. The pump kit has an RRP of $89.95 and is available direct from Pro Accessories and all good bike shops.


MotoPressor Pocket Pump V2 Key Features


Pro Accessories also has a couple of other useful tyre repair things. If it is difficult to attach an inflation hose to your bike’s tyre valves (officially known as Schrader valves) then you can pick up a 90-degree valve extension for $13.95. And if you have a Bosch socket on your bike (like a cigarette lighter socket, but narrower) you can include a PA004 Hella (Bosch) to SAE adaptor for $ 21.95 to make it really easy to power up the pump. Finally, they also offer the MotoPressor digital tyre gauge which is perfect for use with the pump at $19.95.


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