The S 1000 R is an amazing performance naked, but the S 1000 R M-Sport edition takes that level up a gear. Carbon wheels, an Akrapovic and much more... Here is our review. Photography: Zane Dobie

The new S 1000 R arrived mid 2021 and came with a host of changes from a TFT dash to a revised engine, chassis, styling and electronics package. It comes in five variants; Standard, Sport, Race, M-Sport and Clubsport. We tested the M-Sport, and loved every second!

The M-Sport edition comes with the Comfort Package, Dynamic Package and M Package and costs $32,930 ex Sydney Ride Away.

The M-Sport comes with the Comfort Package, Dynamic Package and M Package and is $32,930 ex Sydney Ride Away.

You can read all about the vast amount of updates the S 1000 R got last in the tech breakout below. There are loads of updates that truly bring the S 1000 R even further forward as the ultimate sports naked. It’s faster, lighter, more powerful and more high tech than ever…


SMSP

The five variants mean there is an option for anyone, but of course BMW Motorrad offer almost limitless customising options for any prospective new owners should extra optioning be required. The M-Sport as tested comes in at just a shade under ten grand more than the standard S 1000 R’s price tag of $23,075…



The standard model S 1000 R features ABS Pro, Race ABS, DTC, Dynamic Brake Light, LED lights all-round, TFT dash, Riding Modes, Hill Start Control, Drop Sensor, Passenger Kit and a USB socket in addition to the normal specifications but the R Sport gets Adaptive Headlight, Daytime Riding Light, Headlight Pro, Tyre Pressure Monitor plus the Comfort and Dynamic Packages.

Looking good from any angle, the M-Sport is a lot of money but you get a hell of a lot of motorcycle...

Looking good from any angle, the M-Sport is a lot of money but you get a hell of a lot of motorcycle…

The R Race gets the same plus M chain, battery and forged wheels and a sports muffler. The R M-Sport gets all of that stuff as well as M Endurance Chain, M GPS-Laptrigger, Sports Silencer, M Sport Seat, M Battery, M Carbon Wheels while the top shelf R Clubsport gets the M-Sport goodies plus a Carbon Package, M Billet Pack, and an alarm. Got all that? Click here to learn about the packages…


CFMOTO 450MT

Every now and then a motorcycle comes along that leaves a lasting impression. It could be a mind blowing engine, a sublime chassis, looks to die for or just an overall package of perfection… but these bikes, they don’t come along all that often. In fact, in two decades of reviewing bikes I can count on both hands the number of extra special machines… And now the S 1000 R M-Sports is one of them.

Handling can only be described as sublime. Everything about the S 1000 R M-Sport just gels to perfection.

Handling can only be described as sublime. Everything about the S 1000 R M-Sport just gels to perfection.

My week with the S 1000 R M-Sport began with a ride through the local hills and countryside with Andrew Jenkin, who was onboard the new Tuono V4. We were doing a comparo ride (you can read our Tuono and S 1000 R M-Sport comparison story here), not so much a head-to-head as the Beemer way out does the Aprilia in spec, but more of a V4 or inline-four naked deal. It was a great day and one thing stood out like a Bavarian Cheesake – that is, the S 1000 R M-Sport is an angry beast!


It might have creature comforts and BMW luxury touches but this bike is pure performance…


It might have creature comforts and BMW luxury touches but this bike is pure performance and not for the long haul trip around Australia or for the faint hearted. It means business, no matter the Ride Mode, and the more you give it the more angry it gets. It is without a doubt the fastest inline-four nakedbike I’ve ridden…

The S 1000 R now has the same chassis and engine as the 2019-onwards S 1000 RR, and it shows.

The S 1000 R now has the same chassis and engine as the 2019-onwards S 1000 RR, and it shows. It’s wild.

The new S 1000 R has amazing, linear torque and perfect power delivery from idle to the rev limiter. It’s not instant, explosive response but more a controlled build of huge horsepower and torque. And in that mid-range area, wow, the M-Sport has some very serious go. With the same upgrades as the 2019-onwards S 1000 RR (full review here) but with tuning for more mid-range, the new R has 121kW (165hp) at 11,000rpm. Maximum torque of 114Nm is available at 9,250rpm, so it’s broader and gruntier than before. It also has taller top three gears for more relaxed highway use… Broadening the spread of power even further.



The standard model comes with the usual three Ride Modes – Rain, Road and Sport, but the M-Sport has Dynamic and Dynamic Pro as well, plus the Ride Modes are linked to the DDC so that not only are you getting engine maps, you are also getting suspension behaviour to suit. It’s a fantastic system and very refined these days. In fact, I would not bother to create any customised versions, BMW have the presets spot on, although I didn’t ride it on track and Dynamic Pro may still be a bit soft there.



I spent most of the time in Road, as a lot of my riding was daily duties. I also did a few wet weather rides in Rain, which helps tame things down, but when going for it, I generally chose Dynamic or Dynamic Pro, as I found the DDC still gave a compliant enough ride on the rough roads, but I enjoyed the extra engine response and the wild popping on back-off that Dynamic Pro gives. It sounds horn! Throttle response is amazing, acceleration incredible yet the engine control is intimate and sublime.

The new swingarm, shock position and linkage makes the rear of the S 1000 R hook up like it is glued to the road.

The new swingarm, shock position and linkage makes the rear of the S 1000 R hook up like it is glued to the road.

The gearbox is perfection, with super slick shifts from the quickshifter making it a breeze to work up or down the gearbox. BMW’s Quick Shift Assist Pro is one of the best systems out there if not the best. They were early adopters of the quickshifter and certainly have the experience to create such a refined and reliable system as they have.


Kawasaki

The ratios are good, with first not too tall that you need to slip the clutch for ten kays, and rapid enough acceleration through second and third. I didn’t notice the fourth and fifth changes and sixth gear did have the revs lower at highway speeds but the vibes were still enough to blur the mirrors.

Power, handling, looks, cutting-edge electronics and you have a hell of a good package up in the hills!

Power, handling, looks, cutting-edge electronics and you have a hell of a good package up in the hills!

With the new S 1000 R born slipper clutch and Engine Drag Control, rolling into turns from any speed, whether hard on the brakes or off the brakes altogether, is silky smooth, with the engine not upsetting the chassis at all, no matter how rapid the backshifting. Overall, the engine is an absolute cracker, with that smooth build of power off initial throttle opening, then the four-cylinder reward of rapid revs and mega mid-range to top-end. The only gripe? The motor vibrates like hell through the ‘bars and ‘pegs from 6000rpm, but it’s not a deal breaker, at least not for me.



The chassis, as expected being a superbike frame, swingarm and running gear, is amazing. Again, with well over a decade to refine the S 1000 RR, BMW know what they are doing, and the transition to the S 1000 R for the latest generation has worked. The Flex-Frame offers intimate feel and feedback, not MotoGP stiffness, while still handing out flickability and accuracy. It’s a best of both world’s situation and combined with the top shelf suspension components and the DDC technology, it’s actually mind blowing how good the S 1000 R M-Sport handles…



The mechanical grip at both ends is extraordinary, and combined with the sensational Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa II tyres, the M-Sport is truly on rails. With the upright, roomier ride position and wide ‘bars, plus responsive reactions to footpeg inputs and weight shifting, flicking the S 1000 R from corner to corner is a breeze.



For me, I prefer it to the S 1000 RR handling and ease of riding on the public roads. Everything fits me, from the reach to the handlebars to the seat-footpeg distance and the general rider triangle. It’s stable, too, even hard on the gas off bumpy corners there is not even a wiggle at the ‘bars.

"The mechanical grip at both ends is extraordinary, and combined with the sensational Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa II tyres, the M-Sport is truly on rails."

“The mechanical grip at both ends is extraordinary, and combined with the sensational Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa II tyres, the M-Sport is truly on rails.”

Braking is something BMW know how to do but on the latest S 1000 RR, the switch from Brembo to Hayes calipers was, in my opinion and experience on track, a backwards step. However, on the naked S 1000 R, in road sports conditions, I can’t fault the brakes. Despite only having a conventional master-cylinder not a radial-pull one, they have immediate but not intimidating initial bite, incredible power, and fairly good feel. Not top spec Brembo feel, but not too far off it.



The S 1000 R M Sport Edition is one hell of a motorcycle. Perfect power delivery, from idle to the rev limiter. In Dynamic Pro, it’s the quickest and best handling nakedbike I’ve ever ridden. Sublime steering. Intimate feel. Incredible brakes. And the best sounding, particularly the pop on the back shift. Wow… it’s an angry beast. And it looks amazing in Light White/M Motorsport. Go and try one! 

BMW S 1000 R M-Sport Tech Talk

The in-line four-cylinder engine of the S 1000 R is now based on the engine of the current generation S 1000 RR and makes an impressive 121kW (165hp) at 11,000rpm. Maximum torque of 114Nm is available at 9,250rpm. The engine speed range has been made wider and fuller to achieve improved rideability with a particularly linear torque curve.



In order to reduce noise and fuel consumption levels as well as the engine speed level – especially at cruising speeds on country roads – 4th, 5th and 6th gears now have longer gear ratios. In addition to a smoother, self-reinforcing anti-hopping clutch, the new bike is equipped with engine drag torque control (MSR) for the first time. Engine drag torque control prevents the rear wheel from slipping as a result of abrupt throttling or downshifting thanks to its electronic actuation.

The chassis was also subjected to significant weight reduction in a bid to improve performance and engagement. The frame and swingarm are based on the S 1000 RR and have been made considerably lighter than those of the previous generation model.


Link

At the same time, the engine in the Flex Frame takes on a much greater supporting function than before. The new frame offers further benefits due to its very narrow design, reducing the motorcycle’s width in the area of the knee contact area. This enables a more relaxed riding position with even more freedom of movement, according to BMW.



The underslung swingarm has been adopted from the S 1000 RR, while the spring strut with Full Floater Pro kinematics is now located significantly further away from the swing axis and engine. This prevents the shock from heating up due to waste heat and ensures even more stable temperature behaviour and more constant damping response. In combination with the swingarm, which has its roots in motorsports, this results in more tyre grip and lower tyre wear, BMW claim.

The new S 1000 R is equipped as standard with Dynamic Traction Control DTC, ABS Pro with banking angle optimisation and the three riding modes: Rain, Road and Dynamic. The fully configurable Dynamic Pro mode is also available with a particularly wide range of setting options as part of the Riding Modes Pro option.

With Riding Modes Pro, the new S 1000 R also features the Engine Brake function in conjunction with the engine drag torque control (MSR) and the Power Wheelie function. As part of the Riding Modes Pro option, Dynamic Brake Control (DBC) additionally supports the rider during emergency braking manoeuvres.



The new S 1000 R takes on the instrument cluster of the S 1000 RR. Special emphasis was placed on the best possible readability in addition to an extended range of functions and information. The screen was therefore designed to be large for clear readability and provide optimum information display even under difficult lighting conditions.

The rider can choose between customised screen displays for various purposes. The Pure Ride Screen, for example, provides all necessary information for normal road riding, while a further Core Screen shows displays for banking angle, deceleration and traction control.

The dash is the best in the game, large, easy to read and navigate even at racetrack speeds. Brilliant.

A Bluetooth smartphone interface, which allows app-based arrow navigation, is already included as standard. The TFT display is operated comfortably from the handlebars using the multi-controller, while the optional M package provides a third Core Screen with bar display and lap timer.

The lighting units of the new S 1000 R are based on state-of-the-art LED technology. These include the new, striking LED main headlamp with optimised low beam and high beam light. The newly designed turn indicator and rear lights also make use of LED technology.



The rear turn indicators have been adopted from the S 1000 RR and feature an integrated tail/brake light function. Enhanced safety when riding at night is ensured by the adaptive turning light, which is a component of Headlight Pro.


NG Brakes


2022 BMW S 1000 R M Sport Specifications

Price: From $23,075 Ride Away ($32,930 R/A as tested)
Configure your bike and price here
Claimed Power: 121kW[165hp]@11,000rpm
Claimed Torque: 114Nm[@9250rpm
Wet Weight: 194kg (with carbon wheels)
Fuel capacity: 16.5L
Fuel Consumption: 6.2L/100km


Engine: Liquid-cooled in-line four-cylinder engine, 999cc, DOHC, 80 x 49.7mm bore x stroke, 12.5:1 compression ratio, valve activation via individual rocker arms, variable intake camshaft control system BMW ShiftCam, Gearbox: Constant mesh six-speed with quickshifter Clutch: Self-reinforcing multi-plate anti-hopping wet clutch, 525 chain 17/45 gearing.


Chassis: Aluminium composite bridge Flex-Frame frame, load bearing engine, aluminium underslung double-sided swingarm. Rake: 65.8º Trail: 96mm
Suspension: Marzocchi USD 45mm telescopic fork, spring preload, compression and rebound stage adjustable with DDC, Marzocchi central spring strut rear, spring preload, adjustable compression and rebound stage with DDC.
Brakes: BMW Motorrad ABS Pro, dual 320mm rotors, radial four-piston Hayes calipers, single rear 220mm rotor, single-piston floating Brembo caliper, conventional master-cylinder.
Wheels & Tyres: Carbon-fibre wheels, 3.50 x 17in, 6.00 x 17in, Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa II 120/70 ZR17, 190/55 ZR17.


Dimensions
Wheelbase: 1450mm
Seat height: 830mm (810mm and 850mm available)
Overall width: 812mm
Overall length: 2090mm
Overall height: 1115mm


Instruments & Electronics: 6.5-inch TFT screen, multiple display modes, Keyless Ride, DDC, DTC, Gear Shift Assist Pro, Riding Modes, Cruise Control, Engine Braking Control, Adaptive Headlight, Tyre Pressure Monitor, ABS

 

 

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