Zane has just jumped off the 2022 Ducati Streetfighter V2 he has been testing for the past two weeks. Check out what he thought of the rev-happy, twin-cylinder machine... Photos: Impact.

It has been about four years since I last threw a leg over a Ducati. You can bet that I snatched up the opportunity to take the new Streetfighter V2 for a spin from a brand that has a special place in my heart. There’s just something special about a red Italian machine…

The Streetfighter V2 has entered the Ducati family as entry-level machine for the Streetfighter family...

The Streetfighter V2 has entered the Ducati family as an entry-level machine for the Streetfighter family…

The fact that I am a bit Ducati mad may come as a shock to anyone who knows my car collection. To an outsiders perspective, it would appear that I’m strictly a “Made In Japan” man when it comes to vehicles. The truth is, Japanese cars and bikes are cheaper for something that suits my repertoire of what I’d consider “cool”, Italian cars and bikes hold a special place in my heart that is simply unfulfilled when I take anything else for a spin.


Check out our other Ducati reviews here…


When it comes to Ducati, there is a certain level of acceptance that they’re not perfect in every scenario. When I throw a leg over an Italian bike, I know it’s going to have its quirks, I know it’s not going to be easy to ride but I know that I’m going to have an emotional experience that can only be described as a chorus of delirium while twisting that throttle all the way on. The feeling is multiplied by their model names “Streetfighter”, “Monster”, “Diavel”, the names are not just a sum of letters and numbers, they’ve been named as if they have their own personality…



Rocking up to Ducati’s new offices in Alexandria, the V2 and V4 Streetfighters were sitting front and centre on display. The lines roll off the compact front of the bike, as the tank expands the bike’s stance in the middle while the tail has been snatched straight from the Panigale. The Streetfighter isn’t a bad looking piece of kit, I have to admit, the Panigale does it so much better with it’s balanced look rather than the tiny front-end on the Streetfighter. LED DRL’s and taillights make the bike look absolutely spectacular, while the mid-mount rear shock on display really rounds off the Streetfighter’s appeal.



Taking off from Ducati for the first time and I’m greeted by an entirely different machine to what I was expecting. Jumping onto conventional V-twins, you expect them to have this explosive, low-down torque. The Streetfighter V2 on the other hand, has these humongous pistons with a short stroke, this translates to bucket loads of revs to ensure the bike doesn’t stall and a tough ride at low rpm. Switching out of “Sport mode” into “Road mode”, featuring a lower power engine map, doesn’t see any drastic change in the way the Streetfighter handles low-speed riding. Not to worry, I guess I’ll have the engine in all it’s glory for the rest of the test.

Cruising on the Streetfighter V2 can be tough, the bike begs to be ridden at the top of the rev range.

Cruising on the Streetfighter V2 can be tough, the bike begs to be ridden at the top of the rev range.

Getting out of the city is a bit of a struggle, using that slipper clutch and rear brake to navigate the heavy traffic to the max. Finally, some open roads and high speed limits appear in front of me, it is time to see how the Streetfighter really goes. From a standing start, all is calm, both wheels on the ground and slowly climbing. 6500rpm, all of a sudden the bike bursts in the life, the revs keep climbing and climbing and climbing, no sign of stopping. 8500rpm, the front wheel comes up in the air, at this stage I am debating coming off the throttle. 10,000rpm, I’m now well and truly on one wheel, the numbers on the dash are going up faster than my eyes can process. 11,000rpm, the magic number, the bike is now ready to click up and take it to even higher speeds, I look down at the dash and realise I’m breaking the speed limit in first gear.



That emotional feeling I described earlier hits on another level when riding the Streetfighter V2 at its desired RPM. While up the top of the tachometer, I feel as if I teleported to the drawing boards in Bologna where the designers of the Superquadro engine have just finished their second packet of Chesterfield’s and anyone who dare question the everyday rideability of their creation is met with a shrug and laugh with something along the lines of “It’s a Ducati, it’s not meant to be ridden slow.”

"That emotional feeling I described earlier hits on another level when riding the Streetfighter V2 at it’s desired RPM."

“That emotional feeling I described earlier hits on another level when riding the Streetfighter V2 at its desired RPM.”

The Superquadro hates low RPM, it rattles and shakes like a very angry rat in a box. Keeping the Streetfighter V2 at high RPM saw one thirsty machine, 130km after a refill and I get the petrol light flashing up, with the fact that there is no fuel gauge, I decide not to take the chance and just fill it up again. Sure enough, it took 11L of fuel after I had filled it to the brim just 130km ago, translating to around the 8l/100km mark. Granted, I had the throttle on all the way for most of the test.



The Streetfighter V2 has to be the best sounding four-stroke two-cylinder currently in production. The stock exhaust somehow passed the sound regulations with it’s monstrous sound that only gets better as the RPM rise. There is a valve that shuts off the end of the muffler which makes the exhaust note essentially non-existent, it only seems to close in third gear at very low rpm, probably for ADRs. Cruising around, I’m greeted by what feels like a very hot seat warmer, said seat warmer is the exhaust that loops under the seat. So Italian…

Zane said that the Streetfighter V2 has to be the best sounding four-stroke two-cylinder currently in production.

Zane said that the Streetfighter V2 has to be the best sounding four-stroke two-cylinder currently in production.

The quickshifter is super aggressive, each shift up under load hits like a right hook. It’s not a bad feeling at all, it’s natural and adds to the overall aggressive nature of the Superquadro. I did have a few moments where I was shifting up from first and it would click into neutral. Normally, you wouldn’t stay in first gear but the gearing compliments higher speed riding rather than the low Australian speed limits, so keeping it in first means I can get a good run out of the corners on tight turns. The quickshifter cuts power quite aggressively while not slamming the gears up, making the bike jolt. It may be adjustable for cut time, I’m not sure.

Not a lot is changed in terms of dimensions compared to the Panigale, but the handlebar location creates this awesome middle ground between not too hunched over and not too relaxed.

Not a lot is changed in terms of dimensions compared to the Panigale, but the handlebar location creates this awesome middle ground between not too hunched over and not too relaxed.

The frame, or what is called the frame, is spectacular, the flat one-piece handlebars compliment the riding position and overall rider triangle really well. Not a lot is changed in terms of dimensions compared to the Panigale, but the handlebar location creates this awesome middle ground between not too hunched over and not too relaxed. Everything is mounted solidly, nothing rattles or feels cheap, adding to a much higher confidence to really lean the bike into corners and know that there isn’t going to be a sudden torque twist or move of the steering.



Touring on the Streetfighter V2 is yet another positive, I struggle to feel comfortable on most sportsbikes, however, the front suspension and rear shock soak up any bump in the road. No back breaking rebound, no bone shattering suspension bottom outs, just an enjoyable ride that combines the riding position with a comfortable seat allowing for excellent touring capabilities.

Sitting up quite high and centre takes a lot of weight off the rear wheel while braking.

Sitting up quite high and centre takes a lot of weight off the rear wheel while braking.

High speed corners are where the suspension shows a let-down. Initial turn in sees excellent response but mid corner, the bike moves around a fair bit more than what I’m used to. The stock setting on the preload and rebound are just that little bit too soft, making for an enjoyable daily ride but a tad unstable with the bike leant over. Not to worry, the Streetfighter V2 is fully adjustable front and rear, something I’d consider messing with if daily riding wasn’t on the rostrum for my test period.

"The frame is spectacular, the flat one-piece handlebars compliment the riding position and overall rider triangle really well."

“The frame is spectacular, the flat one-piece handlebars compliment the riding position and rider triangle really well.”

It’s awesome to see a steering damper, especially in such an easy spot to change if you’re looking to go with a more or less aggressive setup. It works really well with stabilising the bike on hard bumps and mid corner, it compensates a lot for the suspension at stock settings, keeping the front wheel pointed where you want it to go. It does make for slightly more work at slow speeds, a lot more pushing of the bars are needed to manoeuvre the steering. Considering the setup was originally designed for the Panigale, the different weight of the headlight and dash on the steering seems to have been overlooked in the design of the Streetfighter V2.



The hoops are awesome, the Pirelli Diablo Rosso IV’s beg to be leant over much further than what my brain is telling me. The 180 rear is narrower compared to the Streetfighter V4 but still provides an ample level of grip, especially on the sides of the tyres. Direction changes are also lightning fast as a result, despite needing to rotate a fair bit between corners, the high rider position mixed with the tall aspect ratio meant that the V2 wanted to fall side to side!

"The hoops are awesome, the Pirelli Diablo Rosso IV Corsa’s beg to be leant over much further than what my brain is telling me."

“The hoops are awesome, the Pirelli Diablo Rosso IV’s beg to be leant over further than what my brain is telling me.”

The brakes are excellent, so much unsprung weight at the rear with a tall seat meant stoppies galore. The twin 320mm semi floating discs at the front are clamped by fantastic Brembo monobloc four piston calipers, allowing for a nice, short stopping distance when coming into a corner too hot. The rear brake is sorted by a 245mm disc with twin piston caliper, some extra stopping power at the rear would’ve been nice due to the heavy usage of the rear brake at slow speeds, it began to develop a squeak too! Maybe I’m using them too much.



The plethora of riding assists are controlled via the full-colour TFT dash, which has been shrunken from 5in on the V4 to 4.3in. The software on the dash is quite easy to use compared to a few of Ducati’s competitors, the buttons are slightly confusing going into the menu blind, but I got the hang of it after a while. The riding modes are changeable/customisable for power modes, traction control, wheelie control, cornering ABS and engine braking.

Plenty of electronic assists with a six-axis IMU. This means you can enjoy a raw bike right until the limit...

Plenty of electronic assists with a six-axis IMU. This means you can enjoy a raw bike right until the limit…

The Ducati Traction control has a whopping eight levels of intervention, six for the dry and two for the rain. My favourite level of intervention has to be level four, it’s about the max traction control you can have before you really start to feel it cut in. The six-axis IMU does an excellent job of allowing plenty of lean and slip before cutting in right at the last minute, I see zero advantage to having the TCS switched off when it’s such an excellent system.



The cornering ABS is a strange one, coming into a corner quick for the first time, I’m greeted by the sensation of the rear wheel moving all over the road, I put it down to a light rear end. Next corner, same thing! It turns out that Ducati have added a “slide by brake” system on the Streetfighter V2, a seriously odd thing to add on a road bike but a cool function that takes a while to get used to. The ABS on the rear brake may need an overhaul, ABS level two saw a few lock ups coming from heavy rear brake usage into corners.

The 2022 Ducati Streetfighter V2 is available in two colours. The Ducati Red always looks stunning...

The 2022 Ducati Streetfighter V2 is available in two colours. The Ducati Red always looks stunning…

The wheelie control works excellently, it’s one of those things you don’t realise how much a bike wants to throw you off the rear until it is switched off. It allows for more than enough front wheel lift to experience the top-end power of the Superquadro without watching the bike cartwheel down the road without you.



The 2022 Streetfighter V2 comes in two different colours, Storm Green and Ducati Red. All day I’d opt for the Ducati red, the first colour that pops in everyone’s head when they think of Italian motoring is a nice, bright red and it would be sacrilegious to have it in any other colour.

"My time spent with the 2022 Ducati Streetfighter V2 was enjoyable, I’m glad to see that Italian motoring hasn’t lost its way."

“My time spent with the 2022 Streetfighter V2 was enjoyable, I’m glad to see that Italian motoring hasn’t lost its way.”

The Streetfighter V2 starts at $22,500 rideaway, a sizeable discount compared to the 2023 Streetfighter V4 at $34,900 rideaway. The V2 sits essentially at the top of twin-cylinder 1000cc naked machines in terms of price, but provides a true entry into the Ducati family capturing the true essence of a Ducati compared to the Monster (the actual entry level Ducati), which seems to sit in its own category.



My time spent with the 2022 Ducati Streetfighter V2 was enjoyable, I’m glad to see that Italian motoring hasn’t lost its way. There are so many things on the Ducati which make you question “why would they do that?”, it also has to be the only motorcycle brand I can think of to which that same question is answered “It’s a Ducati”. Riding the bike made me feel special, an emotion which seems to lack in bikes that seem to just be good at everything. The Streetfighter V2 has a personality and a voice that it’s not afraid to use. A bike that needs to be bought with your heart, not your head…

Tech Talk
The Streetfighter V2 is essentially a Panigale V2 stripped of the fairings, with high and wide handlebar, 178kg dry weight, powered by a 955cc Superquadro delivering 153hp and controlled by a latest-generation electronic package. 

The design concept behind this new model is built around the mechanics inherited from the Panigale V2, with the  Superquadro engine as a bearing element.

The engine of the Streetfighter V2 is the 955cc Euro 5-compliant Superquadro, capable of delivering a maximum power of 153hp@10,750rpm and a maximum torque of 101.4Nm@9,000rpm. Compared to  the Panigale V2, the Streetfighter V2 project has a shorter final ratio (15/45 vs 15/43): this figure guarantees greater torque to the wheel at road speeds while giving better engine responsiveness when re-opening the throttle.

Ducati say that all the improvements to ergonomics allow the rider great control in sporty riding and facilitate everyday use at the same time.

While developing this new model, Ducati engineers focused their obsessive attention on the chassis set-up. The Superquadro engine is used as a bearing element connecting the compact front structure,  consisting of a monocoque frame in die-cast aluminium fixed to the engine head. The single-sided swingarm, which is also connected to the engine, is 16mm longer compared to that of the Panigale V2.



Ergonomics has major rider-centric features and is focused on road use with the added values of sportiness and comfort. The high and wide aluminium handlebars replace the handlebar risers of the Panigale V2. The saddle now is wider and has new padding that contributes to make this bike even more comfortable. In addition, the footpegs have been repositioned to increase the amount of room. 

“The 43mm Showa BPF front fork and the Sachs shock absorber feature dedicated calibration…”

The 43mm Showa BPF front fork and the Sachs shock absorber feature dedicated calibration. The Streetfighter V2 is also equipped with 5-spoke wheels and the new Pirelli Diablo Rosso IV tyres: 120/70 ZR17 at the  front and 180/60 ZR17 at the rear, which provide a super fast response to the rider’s needs. Except for the adoption of less aggressive brake pads, more suitable for road use, the whole braking system is taken from the Panigale V2 and features Brembo M4-32 monobloc radial calipers with 320mm diameter discs.



The comprehensive and modern electronic compartment fitting the Streetfighter V2 is inherited from the Panigale  V2. The 6-axis IMU inertial platform manages all the electronic controls of the bike and gives the position of the  bike in space in real time, sending the information to the control units that manage the controls. The electronic  package includes: ABS Cornering EVO with “slide by brake” functionality, Ducati Traction Control (DTC) EVO 2,  Ducati Wheelie Control (DWC) EVO, Ducati Quick Shift up/down (DQS) EVO 2, Engine Brake Control (EBC) EVO.


ABS Cornering EVO

  • At levels 2 and 3, the ABS system features the Cornering function, which sees the ABS activated even with the bike on an angle, preventing a low side crash. 
  • Level 3 is recommended for road riding or where there is poor grip; it guarantees safe and stable braking and keeps rear wheel lift under control during aggressive deceleration thanks to the Cornering function. 
  • Level 2 is dedicated to amateur riders enjoying road adventures or track days. The system controls both the rear and front braking systems and keeps the cornering function on, but disables lift-up control to allow harder, sportier braking. In selecting Level 2, the “slide by brake” function is activated, allowing the rider to drift into the turns.
  • Level 1 is not the default setting on any Riding Mode: it is recommended for on-track use by expert riders. It ensures racing-standard ABS intervention at the front wheel only. To maximise performance, both the cornering and anti-lift functions are disabled.

Ducati Traction Control EVO 2

  • The Streetfighter V2 is equipped with the MotoGP-derived DTC EVO 2 traction control system, which is managed by the 6-axis Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and adapts intervention based on lean angle.
  •  DTC EVO 2 can be set to 8 different levels (6 for dry conditions, 2 for wet), letting the rider adapt the control strategy to suit individual riding styles

Ducati Wheelie Control EVO

  • The Streetfighter V2 is equipped with the latest version of Ducati Wheelie Control EVO. Using the data feed from the 6D IMU, this system keeps wheelies under control while maximising acceleration easily and safely.
  • DWC EVO provides more accurate wheelie readings, meaning more precise control to ensure the bike responds faster to rider input.

The Ducati Performance catalogue features an extended range of accessories, like the biplane wings, faithfully derived from the Streetfighter V4, guaranteeing downforce of 28kg at 265km/h. Furthermore, a complete Akrapovič racing exhaust is still available, with a further boost of power, up to 157hp and reduces the weight by 7kg. The single-seater kit, the approved Akrapovič exhaust and many other components that enhance the look and characteristics of the bike are also available. 


CFMOTO 450MT

2022 Ducati Streetfighter V2 Specifications

Ducati.com/au

Price: $22,500 rideaway
Warranty: Two-years unlimited km
Colours: Ducati Red, Storm Green
Claimed Power: 112.3kW@10,750rpm
Claimed Torque: 101.4Nm@9000rpm
Wet Weight: 200kg
Fuel capacity: 17L
Fuel Consumption Claimed: N/A
Fuel Consumption (measured): N/A


Engine: Superquadro: 90 ° V2, Desmodromic 4 valves per cylinder, liquid cooled, 100mm x 60.8mm bore x stroke, 955cc, 12.5:1 compression, Electronic fuel injection system. Twin injectors per cylinder. Full ride-by-wire elliptical throttle bodies, 2-1-2-1 exhaust Gearbox: Six speed Clutch: Wet, multiple disc


Chassis: Frame: Monocoque Aluminium
Rake: 24 degrees Trail: 94mm
Suspension: Fully adjustable Showa BPF fork. 43mm chromed inner tubes(f) Fully adjustable Sachs unit. Aluminum single-sided swingarm (r), travel N/Amm.
Brakes: 2 x 320mm semi-floating discs, radially mounted Brembo Monobloc M4.32 four-piston callipers with Bosch Cornering ABS EVO. Self bleeding master cylinder (f), 245mm disc, 2-piston calliper with Bosch Cornering ABS EVO (r)
Tyres: Pirelli Diablo Rosso IV 120/70 ZR17M (f) Pirelli Diablo Rosso IV 180/60 ZR17M (r)


Dimensions:
Seat height: 845mm
Ground clearance: N/A
Overall width: N/A
Overall Length: N/A
Overall height: N/A
Wheelbase: 1465mm


Instruments & Electronics: Full-colour TFT dash, ABS Cornering EVO with “slide by brake” functionality, Ducati Traction Control (DTC) EVO 2,  Ducati Wheelie Control (DWC) EVO, Ducati Quick Shift up/down (DQS) EVO 2, Engine Brake Control (EBC) EVO.


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