Ducati surprised the world with some serious updates to the styling and chassis changes of the Monster. Check out what Zane thought of the new-age Monster 937... Photos: Impact.

The Monster, what a name for a bike. It leaves the mouth with ease and excitement as people ask “what do you ride?” It’s such a beloved machine now and formed an early obsession with bikes for me. Eager to test the biggest update to the model ever is an understatement.

Almost unrecognisable, the Ducati Monster has undergone massive changes for 2022. Check out what Zane though of it...

Almost unrecognisable, the Ducati Monster has undergone massive changes for 2022. Check out what Zane thought.


Check out Zane’s recent test of the Streetfighter V2 here…


One of my earliest memories with motorcycles was sitting on the school bus, coming home from primary school. This black Ducati Monster was following behind, a loud angry twin with an exposed frame and simple front-end seemed to pique my interest. The rider pulled up to the lights and on the tank was “Monster”, I was obsessed with the name, as any 5-year-old would be!



Many, many moons later, I had the chance to ride the LAMS approved Monster on my learner licence. This thing was all I dreamed about, I actually thought I would own one but the $-0.01 in my bank account said otherwise.


Aprilia Q1

It might not be everyone's cup of tea, but its the path that Ducati have decided to go down with the new Monster.

It might not be everyone’s cup of tea, but it’s the path that Ducati have decided to go down with the new Monster.

Fast forward a few more years and a couple of runs on various other updates and versions and here we are. The latest rendition of the motorcycle that pulled Ducati out of some serious financial trouble, creating a gateway into the brand without breaking the bank. Sitting in front of my eyes is not the path I expected Ducati to take, an enormous leap of faith removing the exposed trellis frame that has become such a staple for the model and a crowd favourite.



The bike still looks nice, it still holds a few Monster core values like a big headlight, a cylinder-head poking out the front of the bike and a passenger seat cowl on the Monster Plus edition. Of course, most of this has been catapulted into the 2022, LED lighting all round and a nice full-colour TFT dash. The Monster Plus version seen here has the mini windshield and passenger seat cover, available for an extra $600 over the standard model.



I can’t help but mourn the loss of the trellis frame. Ducati have their reasons, which I don’t doubt equate to a boost in performance, but I do wonder if it was the route that Miguel Angel Galluzzi, the original designer of the Monster, would’ve taken.


Check out Cathcart’s feature on the mastermind behind the Monster here…


Personal styling preferences aside, throwing a leg over the bike for the first time after hopping off the Streetfighter V2 and I’m met with slow speed rideability that the thumping Streetfighter craved. A smaller bore and longer stroke on the Testastretta engine on the Monster compared to the Superquadro show off that the Monster is still the entry level bike in terms of engine rideability, no throttle needed for take off, happy to be at low rpm and plenty of top-end for when you’re ready to take it up there.

Easy to ride at slow speeds, how does the 2022 Monster handle the twisties? Well...

Easy to ride at slow speeds, how does the 2022 Monster handle the twisties? Well…

After riding through the hellish Sydney traffic but still having a ball zipping in between cars, it’s time for some twisties. I’m met with a completely different character compared to similar sized V-twin’s. The Testastretta loves being held around the top of the mid range instead of an explosive burst at the bottom of the rev range.


“There’s no getting bored of the way the engine behaves, there’s plenty of mid range torque with power that only drops off when the needle starts to get close to the red numbers.”


The bore to stroke ratio of 94mm x 67.5mm compliments the RbW throttle and four injector fuelling system quite well. There’s no way you’d be getting bored of the way the engine behaves, there’s plenty of mid range torque with power that only drops off when the needle starts to get close to the red numbers. I wish the engine/exhaust note was just a little bit louder, the 2022 sounds like a whisper compared to the other years.



I don’t have too many ill thoughts about the Testastretta powerplant, but I will admit that the e-throttle is a missed opportunity to supply the bike with a cruise control system. Early RbW models seemed to struggle with mapping issues, I’m glad to see these issues have been ironed out to create a mechanical feeling with all the advantages e-throttle has blessed us with.

Plenty of electronic assists catapult the Monster into the future with a safe and easy ride.

Plenty of electronic assists catapult the Monster into the future with a safe and easy ride.

The main advantage of electronic throttles: allowing for a more accurate and less aggressive assist intervention. The 2022 Ducati Monster sees three riding modes, Sport, Urban and Touring, all with different intervention levels of wheelie control, traction control and power levels. Starting out with the Sport mode, the Monster feels the most alive.


Check out our test and history on the original Monster here...


Allowing all 82kW to be released, the assist system as a whole is spectacular, even at full power. I didn’t feel the traction control step in at all, but I’ve always said that’s a sign of an excellent assist system. Giving it the full beans out of the corners, the front wheel doesn’t even dare think of lifting!



Urban and touring saw a slightly tamer bike, both of these modes feel quite similar with only power delivery being a noticeable difference. I will admit that the Monster is incredibly easy to ride in sports mode, I stayed in it for most of the test and only switch to the others to try them out. I can see the lower power settings being an option for fuel conscious consumption or wet weather riding.

Cruising around is where the Monster feels the most comfortable. Zane kept it in Sport mode for most of the test but there are plenty of options to suit a variety of riders.

Cruising around is where the Monster feels the most comfortable. Zane kept it in Sport mode for most of the test but there are plenty of options to suit a variety of riders and road conditions.

The 4.5in TFT dash and buttons are simple to use. The only part of the entire Ducati system that I had to search up how to use is the launch control. Everything else only takes a matter of seconds to set up, the assist menu can be found within two button pushes, ready to switch modes when you hit some twisty roads.

Small with a deep seat has always been a part of the Monster range. Ducati's formula was to make the bike accessible to all.

Compact dimensions with a deep seat has always been a part of the Monster range. Ducati’s formula was to make the bike accessible to all.

The bike as a whole is tiny for its class. Ducati’s selling formula for the Monster has always been an accessible ride for all, this being evident with the low seat and high, and flat bars. You really sit in the Monster instead of on it, the tank scoops up and the pillion seat cover with the little backrest really locks you in.


NG Brakes

At 184cm my knees did start to cramp up on long rides but there’s no real complaints when it comes to comfort, the ‘bars are easy to reach, the footpegs and seat allow for an upright position and the wide padding on the saddle didn’t hurt my arse after long rides.



The scooped down tank does have its downfalls, the centre plastic on the tank already had scratches on it, which made me reluctant to tuck in through corners so the zipper on my jacket didn’t cause further scratches. The Monster doesn’t need rearsets, but some solid footpegs would be a nice upgrade to improve some foot feeling through the twisties.

The 2022 Monster does become a bit of a handful through the corners due to the downgraded suspension.

The 2022 Monster does become a bit of a handful through the corners due to the downgraded suspension.

The suspension is an aspect of this bike I’m not stoked on. I’ll give the suspension a pat on the back with its ability to create an easy and light steering bike at low-speeds (well, that would be mainly the geometry), it’s a relatively simple setup with city comfort in mind. City comfort in Australia is a whole other ballpark, awfully constructed roads mean that you may as well be off-roading, this is where the Monster shows its hate for bumps as the bone-shattering rebound smacks through your spine after hitting a bump that has only had five out of the 20 council meetings needed before it gets fixed.



Out on the twisties and the setup is a handful. Each corner I have the bike cranked over, I’m feeling out of place and uncomfortable, with my fears being re-affirmed by the front and rear compressing mid corner and then releasing to completely changing my line due to a lack of rebound control. The small amount of adjustment on the rear doesn’t change a whole heap in the aspect of control, stiffening up the rear preload sees a slight improvement, but a lot of the movement comes from the front and its lack of adjustment. The adjustable front seen on a few variations of the old Monster would’ve been a nice addition, Ducati have announced a Monster SP which should help Iron out some of the suspension issues at a cost…

Only the rear has received adjustable suspension in 2022, unlike previous year where some of the range received an awesome adjustable front setup.

Only the rear has received adjustable suspension in 2022, unlike previous year where some of the range received an awesome adjustable front setup.

Back to the tops stuff, Ducati have mounted two Brembo M4.32 monobloc four-piston callipers that grip 320mm rotors to the front of the 2022 Monster. What a braking system! Completely wild for a bike of this weight, it helps add some further performance to the machine. Combined with the cornering ABS and the Monster is trail-braking heaven, the feedback the lever gives you is accurate enough to squeeze and release before the computer kicks in to sort out your mistakes. The rear sees a Brembo two-piston caliper, which also has excellent feel, I give all the rear brakes on the bikes I test a real workout through traffic and the lever feels plenty nimble.



The clutch is another positive of the bike’s rideability, the slipper and assist clutch loves being dragged while using the rear brake for low-speed controllability. The lever also feels awesome and requires very little force to grab the clutch, allowing bite point balance for extended periods of time without hand cramps in traffic! All this adds up to an easily rideable package for customers looking to jump on an simple to ride bike straight off their provisional licence.


“The slipper and assist clutch on the 2022 Monster loves being dragged while using the rear brake for low-speed controllability.”


The quickshifter is an awesome addition to have on the Monster, there’s nothing more fun than slamming through the gears completely unnecessarily. The same issue I had with the Streetfighter V2’s quickshifter showed on the Monster, the system doesn’t like to be shifted anywhere low-down in the rev-range, you also can’t be slow with clicking it into gear as the Monster will jolt/get a little stuck between gears. Awesome system to have on the bike and you’ll get used to the quirks pretty quickly if you owned one.

The quickshifter is perfect for slamming through the gears on corner exits. It works best right on the rev limiter...

The quickshifter is perfect for slamming through the gears on corner exits. It works best right on the rev limiter…

The wheel and tyre package compliment the bike. The Pirelli Diablo Rosso III hoops are a pleasure to have on any bike, the 120/70 – 17in upfront and the 180/55 – 17in have more than enough lean angle, while the similar rolling diameter of the front and rear wheels contribute to the Monster’s low-speed manoeuvrability.



The new Monster is an interesting one, it’s the least Monster of all Monsters including the old LAMS ones. During my test period, when I was referring back to old Monsters and their specifications, I realised that every single past Monster had the formula for mouth-watering styling down-pat, especially the last generation.


SMSP

I can’t help that something is missing on the new Monster, it’s not just the trellis frame or those spectacular header pipes that were on display, its not even the lack of a nice suspension setup. It’s missing the feeling that I get when I ride a Ducati, that special feeling in my heart that has an endearing outlook on the brand as a whole.

The Ducati Monster now starts at $19,200 rideaway or $19,800 for the Monster Plus we tested...

The Ducati Monster now starts at $19,200 rideaway or $19,800 for the Monster Plus we tested…

Then there’s the price, the Monster has always been the entry into the brand. But, for 2022 the Monster starts at a whopping $19,200 rideaway! A price hike of roughly $1000 from the last gen 821. Previous model pricing is besides the point as the Streetfighter V2 has a rideaway price of $22,500, trumping the Monster in every single aspect far beyond the price difference, the Streetfighter V2 also captures the essence of a Ducati much better.

The 2022 model needs to be approached after erasing the old Monster from your brain.

The 2022 model needs to be approached after erasing the old Monster from your brain.

Again, mourning the loss of what we have all come to know as the Monster, the 2022 model needs to be approached after erasing the old Monster from your brain. It’s a great bike in the category of commuting and rideability but loses the famous Monster appeal, I can see the 2022 model being popular with riders who have just broken onto their full licence…

It might not be everyone's cup of tea, but its the path that Ducati have decided to go down with the new Monster.

 

2022 Ducati Monster Tech Talk

The Monster had a major update in 2021, seeing a completely different approach to Ducati’s best selling model. The trellis frame that had become a staple of the brand had been dropped! Along with some of the biggest styling changes the model has seen in 30-years.

The new Ducati Monster has a host of weight saving features but the design has been labeled a 999 moment.

The 2022 Monster is powered by the Testastretta 11° 937cc twin cylinder L-shaped engine, with desmodromic distribution and Euro 5 homologation. Compared to the previous 821 it increases in displacement, power, torque and decreases in weight (-2.4kg). It now delivers 111hp@9,250rpm with 93Nm@6,500rpm, thanks to the increased displacement, the torque is improved at all revs, particularly in the medium-low range. The new motor is also supported by the new gearbox and the Ducati Quick Shift Up / Down fitted as standard.



Ducati said great attention was paid to weight reduction in the creation of the new Monster. Chassis, accessory elements and superstructures have been redesigned from the ground up to create a compact and lightweight bike. The aluminium Front Frame replicates the same concept found on the Panigale V4, it is short and attached directly to engine heads. With a weight of only 3kg this frame is 4.5kg lighter than the previous trellis, helping to reduce the dry weight of the bike to 166kg.



Each component has been redesigned and lightened: the rims lose 1.7kg and the swingarm is lightened by 1.6kg. The rear subframe decreases by 1.9kg thanks also to the GFRP (Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer) technology. The total weight saving is 18kg compared to the Monster 821.

The rear subframe decreases by 1.9kg thanks also to the GFRP (Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer) technology. The total weight saving is 18kg compared to the Monster 821.

The rear subframe decreases by 1.9kg thanks also to the GFRP (Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer) technology. The total weight saving is 18kg compared to the Monster 821.

The seat height has been set to 820mm, Ducati say that this, combined with the narrow sides of the bike, allows riders to put their feet on the ground easily. A seat is available as an accessory that reduces the height from the ground to 800mm, while still maintaining good padding, as well as a kit of springs for the suspension an be purchased, which lower the vehicle by reducing the seat height to 775mm from the ground.



The updated Monster is equipped with a 43mm fork, which ensures 130mm front wheel travel. The adjustable rear shock has an awesome 140mm of travel. The rear shock works in conjunction with the cantilever system, attached directly to the swingarm and with a double K spring.



Ducati developed the brakes in close collaboration with Brembo. Up front mounts twin Brembo M4-32 4-piston monobloc calipers that grip 320mm discs with  a new radial pump.  At the rear is a single 245mm disc gripped by a Brembo caliper.

To increase manoeuvrability at low speeds and facilitate manoeuvring from a standstill, the steering angle was increased to 36° (+7° compared to the 821).

To increase manoeuvrability at low speeds and facilitate manoeuvring from a standstill, the steering angle was increased to 36° (+7° compared to the 821).

To increase manoeuvrability at low speeds and facilitate manoeuvring from a standstill, the steering angle was increased to 36° (+7° compared to the 821). The handlebars has been brought closer to the rider’s torso by about 70mm to have a more upright riding position. The position of the feet has also been changed, and the legs are now less curled up.

The standard equipment includes ABS Cornering, Traction Control and Wheelie Control, all adjustable to different levels of intervention, also included is Launch Control. All controlled through the 4.3in TFT.

The standard equipment includes ABS Cornering, Traction Control and Wheelie Control, all adjustable to different levels of intervention, also included is Launch Control. All controlled through the 4.3in TFT.

The standard equipment includes ABS Cornering, Traction Control and Wheelie Control, all adjustable to different levels of intervention, also included is Launch Control. The updated Monster is equipped with three Riding Modes (Sport, Urban, Touring) and everything is easily managed through the handlebar controls and the 4.3in colour TFT dashboard featuring racing graphics.



The new Monster is available in Ducati Red and Dark Stealth with black wheels, Aviator Grey with GP Red wheels. For those who want the bike with an even sportier image, there is the Plus version in the same colours with an “aerodynamic” windshield and the cover for the passenger seat as standard.


2022 Ducati Monster Specifications

Ducati.com/au

Price: From $19,200 rideaway ($19,800 for the plus)
Warranty: Two-years unlimited km
Colours: Ducati Red, Dark Stealth or Aviator Grey
Claimed Power: 82kW@9,250rpm
Claimed Torque: 93Nm@6500rpm
Kerb Weight: 188kg
Fuel capacity: 14L
Fuel Consumption Claimed: N/A
Fuel Consumption (measured): N/A


Engine: Testatretta: 90° V2, Desmodromic four-valves per cylinder, liquid-cooled, 94mm x 67.5mm bore x stroke, 937cc, 13.3:1 compression, Electronic fuel injection system. Twin injectors per cylinder. Full ride-by-wire elliptical throttle-bodies Gearbox: Six speed, straight cut Clutch: Wet, multiple disc


Chassis: Frame: Aluminium Alloy/Engine member.
Rake: 24 degrees Trail: 93mm
Suspension: 43mm USD Forks, 130mm travel (f) Progressive linkage, preload adjustable monoshock, aluminium double-sided swingarm, 140mm travel (r)
Brakes: 2 x 320mm semi-floating discs, radially mounted Brembo M4.32 monobloc four-piston calipers, radial master-cylinder, Cornering ABS (f), 245mm disc, Brembo two-piston floating caliper, Cornering ABS (r)
Tyres: Pirelli Diablo Rosso III 120/70 ZR17M (f) Pirelli Diablo Rosso IV 180/55 ZR17M (r)


Dimensions:
Seat height: 820mm
Ground clearance: N/A
Overall width: N/A
Overall Length: N/A
Overall height: N/A
Wheelbase: 1474mm


Instruments & Electronics: Full-colour TFT dash, Riding Modes, Power Modes, Cornering ABS, Ducati Traction Control, Ducati Wheelie Control, Daytime Running Light, Ducati Brake Light.


Editor’s Note: If you are reading this article on any website other than BikeReview.com.au, please report it to BikeReview via our contact page, as it has been stolen or re-published without authority.


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