Luca has been out putting some KM's on the updated 2022 Yamaha XSR700 LAMS edition, check out what he thought of the gorgeous, retro-inspired machine... Photos: Zane Dobie.

Riding the 2022 Yamaha XSR700 was the most fun I’ve had on two wheels for ages, I can’t believe they’re making me give it back! I knew Yamaha wouldn’t disappoint, but man, the XSR700 blew me away, exceeding my expectations, I can’t believe it’s LAMS approved!

Luca has been out putting some KM's on the awesome LAMs 2022 Yamaha XSR700!

Luca has been out putting some miles down on the awesome LAMs 2022 Yamaha XSR700!

I arrived at Yamaha in Sydney to pick up the updated XSR700 on a wet day. I was excited and eager to see it in person after spending some time ogling at the press photos. A badass lightweight machine that has beautiful retro colours replicated from the legendary 1982 RD350 and 250LC was mine for the next two weeks!


Check out our review of the MT-07 LA here…


First look at the bike, I was impressed. Everything is brand new, it was glowing as the sun peeked through the clouds! The naked frame with old school styling immediately caught my attention. How good does the engine look on full display? With the modern speedometer even getting the retro treatment, it’s an eye catcher. Yamaha has combined modern technology with historic colour schemes and styles, resulting in an art piece.



Waiting for the rain to stop, I couldn’t resist taking the machine for a spin. Riding home to Wollongong the thoughts running through my head are, “This thing is so easy to ride, with decent power, it sounds nice and most importantly, I look good riding it!” Straight away I notice the responsive throttle and easy-to-use clutch with great feel, making it an awesome bike to learn on.


Riding home, the thoughts running through my head are, ““This thing is so easy to ride, with decent power, it sounds nice and most importantly, I look good riding it!”…


The upright seating positioning is super comfy, especially coming from a slightly lower seat on my Kawasaki EN-6R. Strangely enough, the higher seat made it feel like a motocross bike, making for a plush 100km ride home.

Becoming acquainted with the XSR700, Luca notice all the positives of the bike instantly after throwing a leg over the bike.

Becoming acquainted with the XSR700, Luca noticed all the positives of the bike instantly after throwing a leg over it.

The XSR700 idles quietly from the EURO5 approved exhaust system, but the bike really comes to life when opening the throttle. The induction noise is spectacular and the exhaust is at that perfect noise level that doesn’t annoy my neighbours, it sounds great blipping for downshifts. The smaller bored and restricted LAMS model puts out 38.3kW@8000rpm and 57.5Nm@4000rpm, which is honestly more than enough for a LAMS machine and performs great in the low to mid rev range.



The XSR700 weighs in at just 185kg, for a 655cc LAMS bike that’s light! With the weight being kept to a minimum, it allows for an easy ride and beginners will have no trouble getting through the tight, slow speed M.O.S.T course to score their P plates. Changing directions through tighter roads and braking makes it easy on the shoulders, having to pull up less weight while keeping excellent stability.

"With the weight being kept to a minimum, it allows for an easy ride and beginners will have no trouble getting through the tight, slow speed M.O.S.T course to score their P plates."

“With the weight being kept to a minimum, it allows for an easy ride and beginners will have no trouble getting through the tight, slow speed M.O.S.T course to score their P plates.”

I caught up with a mate to go riding through Jamberoo, up the mountain and back down Macquarie Pass, NSW, a famous riding area. The roads were still damp from rain the day before, so we were riding carefully. Surprisingly I could keep a quick pace, feeling confident with grip on the Michelin tyres in damp conditions.



We entered a long private road to try and test the top speed safely. With slight head winds I was able to reach about 175km/h in fourth gear revving all the way to 9000rpm. Surprisingly, 5th and 6th gear had no more drive, as the bike is over geared in terms of performance, lacking top end, which is also noticeable when riding slow in a higher gear. The longer gears do come in handy to use that lowdown torque at freeway speeds. With lower gearing it would pull fifth and sixth gears for a higher top speed.

Luca did note that the XSR700 gearing was slightly too long, with fifth and sixth not getting used much.

Luca did note that the XSR700 gearing was slightly too long, with fifth and sixth not getting used much.

Besides the gearing, I do like how torquey the 655cc parallel twin is. The sweet spot is from about 3000-7000rpm making it easy to wheelie and control from first to third gear. Fuel wise, tank capacity is 14L and even after thrashing it a fair bit, I managed to keep it around 4.6L-5.2L/100km. The fuel economy is quite good, especially now with the increase of fuel prices you’ll be saving money in style.

Despite being Learner approved, Luca had no trouble getting the bike up on the rear wheel. No wonder the XSR's brother, the MT-07, is a popular choice for stunt riders!

Despite being Learner approved, Luca had no trouble getting the bike up on the rear wheel. Ahh. Skills…

I started riding the XSR700 more aggressively to get a feel for the chassis. Look, I’ve felt better suspension. The link-type monocross rear suspension isn’t the greatest feature, having too high of a rebound. Turning at higher speeds, riding out of the corner, hitting a bump or ditch can upset the bike and it can become hard to control while trying to go quicker.


Check out our 2017 XSR900 Video here… 


Looking online I found XSR700 riders with the same problem, especially when taking pillion passengers… User bbninja “The rear suspension seems to get loose and gives me that feeling of uncertainty” is now looking to find an alternative suspension setup for their Yamaha XSR700. I’d also be looking for a shock upgrade if I had one in my garage, which is no big deal.



The front-end feels great going into corners, this came as quite a surprise as you sit upright compared to something like a supersport bike. I found when rolling off the brake mid corner there is a slight lack of front-end feeling. However, driving out of the corner the bike is very stable, smooth and grippy so you can be aggressive on the throttle. I didn’t have any other complaints about the conventional telescopic forks, perfect for this style of bike.

"driving out of the corner the bike is very stable, smooth and grippy so you can be aggressive on the throttle."

“Driving out of the corner the bike is very stable, smooth and grippy so you can be aggressive on the throttle.”

Straight away, you notice the awesome Nissin brakes on this bike, they are quite sensitive, especially the front brake with the twin four-piston calipers and 298mm discs. They work well braking at higher speeds and you can definitely give it some without ABS kicking in. It can be difficult to try and “stoppie” at slower speeds but I think it’s crucial to have ABS features especially on learner approved bikes. The rear brake does the job, helping around town and in cornering.



The Yamaha XSR700 is fitted with dazzling, LED heritage inspired lighting. The headlight is a split projector in a semi-circular layout, one half is the DRL and the other is the highbeam, which is extremely bright. The taillight has a single classic round shape.



These features result in awesome clarity and, more importantly, safe night riding with plenty of visibility while looking pretty damn cool. It really rounds out the retro appeal of the XSR700 well. The machine also has quite subtle yet visible LED Indicators, the front indicators stick out from the radiator and rear indicators from the mudguard slightly above the plate holder.

With a 14L tank, you could pull over 350km before your next fill up with some fuel conscious riding!

With a 14L tank, you could pull over 350km before your next fill up with some fuel conscious riding!

As for the gadgets, the handlebar controls are easy to use and have everything necessary. The left side keeps it simple with a high and low beam switch, indicators and horn button. On the right is the start and stop engine switch that you thumb push so you don’t accidentally hit it while riding. The hazard light switch is below.



The dash is pretty simple, it will show you what gear you’re in, your speed in km/h and fuel level. There is a button to change pre-sets you can switch between fuel average of a trip and live fuel averages in L/100km.


Check out our older 2016 XSR700 Review here…


Fuel usage varies whether you’re riding slow or fast, so when you’re not hammering it going flat out the fuel injection system turns into Economy Mode, saving fuel as you’re cruising on a highway or motorway showing up as (ECO) on the dash.

". The bike is deceptively quite small but that toqurey engine and chunky tyres make it feel like a full-powered monster."

“The bike is deceptively quite small but that torquey engine and chunky tyres make it feel like a full-powered monster.”

The dash has plenty of other great features like engine temp, air temp, a digital clock and of course overall km’s and trip distances. You don’t need to be a technology freak to configure your dash, it’s straightforward, the way it should be.


“Yamaha have created a comfortable, stylish, lightweight bike which displays awesome agility. It’s definitely an awesome A to B bike but more of a looker than a racer…”


Yamaha have created a comfortable, stylish, lightweight bike leading to good agility. As a result, it’s definitely an awesome A to B bike but more of a looker than a racer. The XSR700 has easy mobility which allows the bike to ride comfortably in tighter environments like the city or suburban riding. The bike is deceptively quite small but that torquey engine and the chunky tyres make it feel like a full-powered monster, despite being learner approved, it still loves to get up and boogie.

The XSR700 is the perfect all-rounder, easy to ride slow and super fun to ride fast!

The XSR700 is the perfect all-rounder, easy to ride slow and super fun to ride fast!

Short and long trips are great because of the soft seat. The cushion feels top quality. Sinking into it feels “cruisey” and my favourite thing about it though is the angle it drops off from the side. It makes it easy to find the sweet spot when changing seat positions from left to right and most importantly, it is super comfortable.

"For $13,699.00 ride away you’re getting a high-quality, stunning motorcycle that you won’t regret handing the cash over for."

“For $13,699 ride away you’re getting a stunning motorcycle that you won’t regret handing the cash over for.”

For $13,699 ride away you’re getting a high-quality, stunning motorcycle that you won’t regret handing the cash over for. Cruising along the coast or riding up mountains the Yamaha XSR700 fits the role. I just love how easy it is to ride, having power there made it easy to get attached to like a best friend.



Honestly, having such a beautiful finish and top shelf quality, it is, without a doubt, a great “bang for your buck” LAMS bike. Especially the 2022 heritage white and black colours, it is simply awesome.

"I absolutely loved riding the 2022 XSR700, The retro design made this bike stand out from the neighbouring 650cc manufacturers."

“I absolutely loved riding the 2022 XSR700, The retro design made this bike stand out from the neighbouring 650cc LAMs manufacturers.”

I absolutely loved riding the 2022 XSR700, The retro design made this bike stand out from the neighbouring 600-900cc machines. When it came time to hand it back, I found myself searching for my own one, as I have fallen in love with it. I’d change the rear suspension on the bike but besides that it was a very comfortable bike to ride.

Three-gear wheelies were no issue for Luca on the XSR700...

Three-gear wheelies were no issue for Luca on the XSR700…

I would recommend the Yamaha XSR700 to any of my friends and family who are starting to ride motorbikes and are looking for a trustworthy, yet powerful fun bike as it is very easy to handle and allows for you to feel safe and under control.

Luca is wearing the Kabuto RT-33 Signal lid, Five RFX1 gloves, Moto Dry Hunter Hoodie and Moto Dry Roadster boots. Gear reviews on the way...

Luca is wearing the Kabuto RT-33 Signal lid, Five RFX1 gloves, Moto Dry Hunter Hoodie and Moto Dry Roadster boots. Gear reviews on the way…


Check out this XSR700 Scrambler Custom build…


Tech Talk

For 2022 Yamaha’s XSR700 is available in two hot new retro colours that echo the legendary liquid-cooled two-strokes of the 1980s. Yamaha’s RDLC range took the two- heeled world by storm and the new XSR700s are set to bring back the passion with a new LED headlight, larger and reshaped front brake disc for improved stopping performance and a revised cockpit layout.



Neat design touches include the scalloped paint lines that nod to the popular 40-year-old 250 and 350cc hotrods. XSR700 is based on the MT-07LA model and is fully LAMs approved with a 655cc twin cylinder 270-degree engine that is tuned to maximise learner bike regulations.


2022 XSR700 Key features

  • 655cc 270-degree parrallel twin engine – fully LAMs approved
  • New XSR family LED lighting
  • Larger 298mm front brake disc
  • Revised cockpit layout with integrated headlight stays
  • Evolved design details
  • Light and slim tubular backbone frame
  • Colouring and graphics inspired by iconic RDLC range

Purpose-built at the factory to suit the Australian LAMs market, the 655cc twin-cylinder liquid-cooled engine delivers mid-capacity power with a linear and predictable surge; exhilarating for newer riders, and satisfying for experienced hands, plus there is the HO (high output) version if you want more.



The latest 689cc (655cc for LAMS) 2-cylinder CP2 engine features a revised air intake duct design and optimised fuel injector settings, as well as a new 2-into-1 exhaust and new ECU. The engine looks to deliver smoother torque/rpm curve for an increased claimed top speed and acceleration. Yamaha have also claimed that the XSR700 will deliver 67.0Nm@6500rpm and 54kW@9000rpm in its HO configuration. A new electric purge cut valve and lightweight battery ensures easy starts even when the machine has been parked for longer periods as well.



The Yamaha XSR700’s front dual rotor size is increased from 282mm on the previous model to 298mm on the new bike, which gives more stopping power and greater controllability with no gain in weight, together with the 245mm rear rotor, the new system offers increased performance and with the fitment of the new Michelin PR5 tyres, the increased stopping power is especially in wet conditions.

You can pick one up from your local Yamaha dealership for an RRP of $13,699 rideaway in Historic Black or Historic White!

"For $13,699.00 ride away you’re getting a high-quality, stunning motorcycle that you won’t regret handing the cash over for."

2022 Yamaha XSR700 LAMS Specifications

yamaha-motor.com.au

Price: From $13,699 ride away
Warranty: Two year/unlimited kilometre
Colours: Historic Black, Historic White
Claimed Power: 38.3kW@8000rpm
Claimed Torque: 57.5Nm@4000rpm
Claimed Weight: 186kg wet
Fuel Capacity: 14L


Engine: Liquid-cooled, DOHC, inline-twin, four-stroke, four-valve, 78 x 68.6mm bore x stroke, 655cc, 11.0:1 compression, lightweight one-piece two-into-one exhaust
Gearbox: Six speed
Clutch: Wet, multiple disc


Chassis: High tensile steel tubing backbone-type frame, asymmetrical steel swingarm.
Suspension: 41mm front forks, 130mm travel, adjustable link-type Monocross rear shock, 130mm travel,
Brakes: Dual 298mm front wave rotors, four-piston calipers, single 245mm rear wave rotor, single-piston Nissin caliper
Wheels & Tyres: Lightweight cast aluminium 10-spoke, Pirelli Phantom Michelin Road 5, 120/70-ZR17, 180/55-ZR17


Dimensions:
Seat height: 835mm,
Overall height: 1130mm,
Overall length: 2075mm
Wheelbase: 1405mm


Instruments: Bar mounted LED display


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2022 YAMAHA XSR700 LAMS GALLERY


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