Yamaha’s Tricity 155 is a cool little scooter from Yamaha, with sporty looks and an interesting dual front-wheel setup. Review by Kris Hodgson

So straight up the Tricity has sporty looks, with an aggressive front fairing and dual front wheel setup, that isn’t dissimilar to the Niken they announced at EICMA last year. I’m pretty sure I looked cooler riding the Tricity than the press shots of the rider in a white bodysuit on the Niken too. All my bodysuits were at the laundromats.

Yamaha's 2018 Tricity 155 features the new 155cc Blue Core powerplant and a new frame - Image courtesy of Yamaha Motor Europe

Yamaha’s 2018 Tricity 155 features the new 155cc Blue Core powerplant and a new frame. Pics taken with my selfy stick mid-corner didn’t turn out, so I’ve borrowed some from Yamaha Europe – Image courtesy of Yamaha Motor Europe

Powered by the company’s ‘Blue Core’ 155cc single-cylinder powerplant that is also found in the NMax (which is 50kg lighter), there’s punchy power on tap from throttle open to 50km/h and smooth fueling throughout the rev range. Fuel economy is also exceptional, as you’d expect, with an economy warning light on the dash which you’re meant to deactivate as much as possible, as I understood it.

 

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Part of this comes down to Yamaha’s Variable Valve Actuation or VVA, which is used to offer different cam profiles at different rpm, meaning you don’t need to compromise performance for just one area, but can deliver an ideal low to mid rpm profile, and high rpm profile for example. This helps provide broader power, but also offers the benefit of significantly better fuel economy and emissions.

The Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) allows lower emissions and a better all-round power delivery

The Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) allows lower emissions and a better all-round power delivery

However you look at it, it’s an ideal powerplant for an urban commuter, and being an automatic makes for a convenient, stress free experience regardless of how heavy traffic is. That extra width at the front does somewhat limit your filtering, but it’s not extreme by any means and I think the extra stability will be a real boon for those looking at this option.

While I wouldn’t park the Tricity and expect the dual front wheels to keep it upright, they do offer a more planted and stable feel, which is ideal for those who may be lacking in confidence and need the convenience of a scooter or motorcycle for transport. Keeping in mind this is a learner legal option, it’s a great way of gently entering the two-wheeled world.

Dual front wheels are supported by dual forks on each side, with sporty 14in six-spoke wheels and a disc brake assembly on each

Dual front wheels are supported by dual forks on each side, with sporty 14in six-spoke wheels and a disc brake assembly on each

What kind of limitations does that front setup include? Well to be honest running out of ground clearance on roundabouts was more a testament to my carefree approach to suburban hooning, and is the same thing I’ve encountered on 250-300cc and scooters. Plenty of lean angle for this style of scooter is still possible, and apart from being able to feel the balancing system between the two sets of forks at times (when upright), it’s really little different than a regular scooter. Just more stable as mentioned.

The dual-dual fork setup is obviously there to handle the stresses caused by this kind of front end design, and probably the most noticeable issue this causes is a stiff front end – on the scooter – when going over speedbumps or onto driveways from the road. I could slow down… but no one likes a conformist.

A large rear disc brake is also featured with a UBS or Unified Brake System

A large rear disc brake is also featured with a UBS or Unified Brake System

So handling is scooter-like, and coming from a motorcycle you’ll need to use what seems like copious amounts of brake to control your excessive speed – if you ride like me, in an un-scooter-like manner – rather than being able to rely on a gearbox and engine braking.

The Tricity is well sorted in this regard, with a disc brake on each of the front wheels, mounted to the inside of the wheels, which are single-side mounted, as well as the usual rear disc brake system. Linking these systems together is the UBS or Universal Braking System, with ABS as standard fitment.

Brake feel is good, with non-adjustable levers and simple switchblock controls

Brake feel is good, with non-adjustable levers and simple switchblock controls

I first noticed the UBS when using the brakes, because if you’re holding one brake lever in (braking) and then apply the other, there’s a noticeable pressure drop in the opposite lever. This isn’t felt through the actual brakes themselves, just at the lever and is not that easily noticed. On the D’elight on the other hand, it is very noticeable, which highlighted what was going on. Overall brake performance is good, without being over the top, and it would be hard to catch yourself out unless you really misjudge your braking distances.

There’s no extensive electronics system, just the ABS, with a wide digital dash with two buttons at the top that allow switching through options, and resetting your trip meters. Simple. There’s also a hand brake on the left ‘bar for those difficult parking situations.

Now on to two very important scooter features, comfort and storage. The single-piece seat is released via the ignition, with a counter clockwise turn of the key releasing the seat. The seat itself is large, comfortable, and offers plenty of room to move around on. Doing some longer, probably less typical rides I remained comfortable, with the footwell area allowing a good amount of leg room and a pretty natural foot resting place, even with my massive motorcycle boots on.

A hook allows a bag to be hung between your legs, while a small glove box compartment includes an oldschool power outlet, meaning a mobile could be stored and charged in here as needed. As far as I could tell it doesn’t lock, so don’t leave anything valuable in here.

Lift the seat and you’ve got access to a very simple fuel tank cap, which you turn to release and is unattached, so don’t lose it. 7.2L of fuel capacity seems generous, with good mileage and cheap refills, making for an ideal inner city commuter for the budget minded.

Underseat storage will fit a full helmet

Underseat storage will fit a full helmet

The underseat storage will fit a regular helmet, and whatever you can stuff inside the helmet, so at the very least you won’t be lugging your lid around everywhere you go.

Now one note for the new Tricity 155 is the fact this is a vastly upgraded model over the old 125 version, which I never had the opportunity to test.

Straight up Yamaha are claiming better fuel economy, with the obvious power gains that adding 30cc makes on top of 125, plus of course the general advancements made in the last few years. The frame is all new too, while the headlight is LED, and storage is increased over the previous model.

The Tricity 155 is a great urban commuter and ideal for running around the city

The Tricity 155 is a great urban commuter and ideal for running around the city

The Tricity is produced by Thai Yamaha Motor, and the finish quality is a real strong point, with the matte ‘Cyber’ blue a real eye catcher. It’s a little messy with the front setup, but that’s hidden by the front fairing and wheel guards and isn’t something you’d normally notice.

Overall I was really impressed with the Tricity, it has the looks and the performance to make a commendable urban or city commuter, and really stands out from the crowd. 15hp is by no means breathtaking, but Yamaha deliver it in just the right way to ensure a fun experience.

 

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The cool front-end setup is a departure from the norm, and I’d love to see a larger capacity version like a 300cc to take the concept to the next level, but as it stands I think it’s a commendable offering.

If you’re looking for a small capacity transport and don’t have your heart set on a motorcycle, check out the Tricity 155, it would be hard to find anything easier to get started riding on, and for a city runaround is a great option.

Sporty, futuristic and cool, the Tricity is a great option

Sporty, futuristic and cool, the Tricity is a great option

2018 Yamaha Tricity 155 ABS (LAMS) Specifications

yamaha-motor.com.au

Price: $5,099 + ORC
Warranty: One-year, unlimited kilometre
Colours: Cyber Blue, Oxford Grey

Claimed power: 11.1kW[14.8hp]@8000rpm
Claimed torque: 14.4Nm@6000rpm
Wet weight: 165kg
Fuel capacity: 7.2L

Engine: Liquid-cooled, four-stroke, SOHC, four-valve, 155cc, 58 x 58.7mm bore x stroke, 10.5:1 compression, EFI, TCI, V-Belt Automatic, Variable Valve Actuation (VVA)
Gearbox: Auto

Chassis: Backbone frame, Unit swingarm
Suspension: Dual telescopic forks, 90mm travel, dual rear shocks, 90mm travel
Brakes: ABS, Dual 220mm front rotors, single 230mm rear rotor, single-piston calipers
Wheels & Tyres: Alloy six-spoke wheels, 90/80 – 14, 130/70 – 13

Dimensions:
Wheelbase: 1350mm
Seat height: 780mm
Overall height: 1210mm
Overall width: 750mm

Instruments: Multifunction LCD display

 

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2018 Yamaha Tricity 155 ABS (LAMS) Gallery

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