Nick has been out on the all-new, LAMS approved Triumph Tiger Sport 660. Check out what he thinks of the road centric adventure sport machine... Photos: Heather Ware HMC Photography

The 2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 takes the cake as my favourite LAMS bike I’ve ridden this year. Without even mentioning the absolute pearler of an engine pumping out 55hp and 62Nm of torque, there’s plenty on this bike that puts it in top spot in my 2022 LAMS book.

Nick and Jeff threw a leg over the all-new Triumph Tiger Sport 660. Check out what they thought of the LAMS approved adventure-tourer.

A full sized LAMS machine, the Tiger 660 Sport is a great all-rounder that would serve long term with full licence.


Check out our Trident 660 LAMS review here…


I had a couple of weeks and several hundred kilometres of riding on the Tiger Sport 660, and damn did I have some fun. While it sits within the LAMS ‘adventure’ category – it is definitely aimed at the tarmac end of the spectrum, it is far more suited to long road touring with minimal off-road travel. If you’re new to motorcycles, new to the touring scene or just want a full sized machine with some wicked kit attached, you can’t look past testing out Triumph’s Tiger 660.



Between the smooth triple-cylinder power delivery, fast throttle response, SHOWA suspension and big twin caliper brakes (with ABS), Triumph provide a lot of bike for an appropriate price of $14,990.00 ride away. Not to mention the 17-litre fuel tank, adjustable front screen, and super comfortable two-up seat. It’s a fantastic first choice for those of you looking for a decent ‘all-rounder’, with the assured quality of a reputable brand.

The Tiger Sport 660 has a bit for everyone. There’s plenty of space, it’s plenty comfortable, very agile, and certainly punchy enough for a LAMS machine.

The Tiger Sport 660 has a bit for everyone. There’s plenty of space, it’s plenty comfortable, very agile, and certainly punchy enough for a LAMS machine.

The Tiger Sport 660 has a bit for everyone. There’s plenty of space, it’s plenty comfortable, very agile, and certainly punchy enough for a LAMS machine. The triple-cylinder puts out a perfect amount of power for any new rider, or anyone looking for a machine that won’t scare the hell out of you, every ounce of power is usable right across the rev range.



Despite having plenty of low-end torque, when the numbers on the speedo climb the power stays linear all the way to just before the limiter, the acceleration is absolutely not what you’d expect out of a learner machine!


Triumph claims 4.5L/100km, which isn’t far from what I managed over the week or two (4.6-4.8) of some pretty hard riding…


At freeway speeds, it sits comfortably at 110km/h, riding up and down to Uni in Newcastle saw some pretty awesome fuel economy. Triumph claims 4.5L/100km, which isn’t far from what I managed over the week or two (4.6-4.8) of some pretty hard riding. Given the current fuel prices, I was absolutely cheering!

A positive for these mid-capacity LAMS bikes is their awesome fuel economy mixed with just enough power for weekend fun.

A positive for these mid-capacity LAMS bikes is their awesome fuel economy mixed with plenty enough power…

First gear was a bit shorter than I’m used to, the torquey nature of the triple made it difficult to ride at slow speeds without clicking up into second. At least the trade-off meant that the front end has no issue throwing itself in the air in first. Due to the high compression and light flywheel, the revs drop very quickly on closed throttle, so you’ve got to be fast on the shifts. This did take some getting used to, and a quickshifter would really be put to good use here.



Handling wise – the bike is very agile. I think this is likely due to a combination of the tall, upright riding position, wider ‘bars, and rake angle. Regardless, it is super nimble in traffic and makes lane-filtering a breeze. In the corners, the SHOWA forks and rear shock are well suited in the chassis, there is plenty of confidence in the front-end.


Overall, it feels rock solid and of high quality. Between the colour schemes and wealth of add-ons to choose from, the 2022 Tiger Sport 660 is a weapon of a LAMS bike…


With the decent OEM rubber, it is possible to push quite hard through the twisties. While leaning the bike over, I started to notice the factory forks falling a little short, but this is only when pushing it to the limit and the soft ride is a good compromise anyway.



The big brakes are more than capable for the bike, I’d even go so far as to recommend being careful grabbing the front (even though you’ve ABS) if you’re a newer rider. They pull up hard and don’t seem to fade even when they start to get hot. Feel and modulation are good, too.

Despite it's statue, Nick says the Tiger Sport 660's chassis loves to have a boogie through the twisties!

Despite it’s size, Nick says the Tiger Sport 660’s chassis loves to have a boogie through the twisties!

It’s very comfortable on the longer rides, likely due to the upright position and soft seat, with decent leg room. The screen doesn’t do much for me and I still cop a significant amount of wind buffeting. For anyone under 190cm, it’d likely be a lot better. I’m just too tall for every screen!



The controls are simple and easy to navigate when wanting to turn off TC and/or ABS, while everything you realistically need is displayed on the TFT dash. Sure, there’s more you could add here (cruise-control) but for the newer rider, it’s all you need.

Catering more towards mature riders with its price tag, the Tiger Sport 660 is plenty of bike for the money with more than enough power to carry you over to your fulls!

Catering more towards mature riders with its price tag, the Tiger Sport 660 is plenty of bike for the money with more than enough power to carry you over to your fulls!

Overall, it feels rock solid and of high quality. Between the colour schemes and wealth of add-ons to choose from, the 2022 Tiger Sport 660 is a weapon of a LAMS bike, capable of some wicked touring/adventure rides. It’s the type of bike you’d likely build towards where you want to travel. While it is sitting at the higher end of the LAMS market in terms of pricing, you do pay for quality. What an awesome bike…

Colour-wise, you’ve got some awesome choices: Lucerne Blue / Sapphire Black, Korosi Red  / Graphite and Graphite / Sapphire black (our review model).

As we had hoped for, we’ve got the liquid-cooled, 12 valve DOHC inline triple-cylinder 660cc LAMS approved powerplant.

As we had hoped for, we’ve got the liquid-cooled, 12 valve DOHC inline triple-cylinder 660cc LAMS approved engine.

As we had hoped for, we’ve got the liquid-cooled, 12 valve DOHC inline triple-cylinder 660cc LAMS approved powerplant. With a 74.04mm bore, 51.1mm stroke and an 11.95:1 compression ratio, you have an incredibly smooth, responsive, and linear power delivery. The 660 produces 55.5hp@8,750rpm via multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection and RbW controlled throttle-body, which is quite substantial on a LAMS machine.



The triple flows through a stainless steel 3-into-1 header system with a low single sided stainless silencer. It’s got a nice note to it, but I’d like to see what aftermarket options are available to really let out that triple growl. The engine feeds a multi-plate wet clutch, which is plenty smooth and capable, and out into a six-speed gearbox and X-ring chain drive.

The 660cc powerhouse is supported by a tubular steel perimeter frame and a twin-sided steel swingarm.

The 660cc powerhouse is supported by a tubular steel perimeter frame and a twin-sided steel swingarm.

The 660cc powerhouse is supported by a tubular steel perimeter frame and a twin-sided steel swingarm. At both ends you’ve got cast aluminium 17in wheels (3.5in F and 5.5in R) with Michelin 120/70 ZR 17 (58W)  and 180/55 ZR 17 (73W) hoops. Out of the factory we’ve got SHOWA 41mm upside-down separate function cartridge front forks that boast 150mm of wheel travel. On the rear is a SHOWA monoshock RSU with hydraulic preload adjustment and 150mm of travel.



Brakes are pretty damn important on a LAMS machine, and Triumph certainly doesn’t disappoint here. On the front are twin 310mm discs held via Nissin two-piston sliding calipers, with a single 255mm disc and single piston Nissin in the rear plus ABS front and rear.

Up top you’ve got quite a nice-looking colour TFT screen. While it’s simple, it’s perfectly suited for a LAMS machine. You have the option to ride in Road or Rain, which is relatively easy to navigate to. Otherwise, you simply click through what you’d like to see on the little display. Unfortunately, no cruise-control for 2022!



The ‘bars are nice and wide at 834mm, while the bike overall sits at just under 1.4m with the windscreen maxed out. The seat is 835mm, which makes it easily accessible even for the smaller riders and it weighs in at 206kg wet. While it sounds heavy, with the 23.1-degree rake and 97.1mm trail, paired with a nice upright riding position, the bike is very agile.


Zero Motorcycles

Tiger 660 Sport Tech Talk from Triumph

The 660cc powerplant in the new Tiger Sport 660 brings Triumph’s triple engine performance advantages over a twin engine with its low-down torque, combined with strong mid-range performance, and incredible top-end power. Triumph say it delivers the perfect balance of thrilling useable performance from low down in the rev range, all the way to the redline. 

Power delivery is managed by a sophisticated engine management system with a ride-by-wire throttle for a precise and responsive feel, while the slick six-speed gearbox has gear ratios optimised for fun and all-round everyday rideability. The 660 triple engine’s distinctive, deep exhaust note is delivered through a short and minimalistic underslung stainless-steel silencer. 



Triumph claim the Tiger has been perfectly balanced and is easy to control, with precise steering aided by lightweight aluminium tapered handlebars. The twin seat is practical and comfortable, with an accessible rider seat height of 835mm and optimised pillion grab handles fitted as standard. 

The suspension has been developed to deliver all of Triumph’s handling advantages, with a sporty feel when riding alone, while also offering a plush feel for longer trips and two-up touring. On the front, the Tiger Sport 660 is equipped with 41mm Showa upside-down cartridge forks, delivering 150mm of wheel travel. These are matched with the Showa monoshock on the rear, with a dual rate spring to optimise performance for solo or pillion riding. The monoshock also features remote hydraulic preload adjustability for tailoring the ride for a pillion and/or luggage.  



The five-spoke, 17-inch wheels are lightweight cast aluminium, adding to the bike’s agility, while the Michelin Road 5 tyres bring great road holding performance in both dry and wet conditions. Excellent stopping power is achieved thanks to the Nissin twin-piston sliding calipers with twin 310mm front discs, controlled by the span-adjustable brake lever.


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The tank holds 17 litres of fuel giving great range, while the sleek screen is height adjustable through a simple, one-handed operation, enabling the rider to easily adjust the level of weather and wind protection while riding.



Touring capability is enhanced with the discreetly integrated pannier mounts, which allow for the easy and seamless fitment of the dedicated new accessory panniers while maintaining the clean styling of the rear bodywork when riding without luggage. For additional luggage capacity, an accessory 47-litre topbox is also available, which can securely accommodate two full-face helmets. The panniers and topbox can also be colour coded to match the bike.

The new Tiger Sport 660 is equipped with the new multi-functional instruments and TFT display.

The new Tiger Sport 660 is equipped with the new multi-functional instruments and TFT display, which provides all necessary rider information in a clear, compact and uncluttered design. These have been specifically designed to integrate seamlessly with the accessory fit My Triumph connectivity system, which enables turn-by-turn navigation, GoPro control, and phone and music interaction, all operated via the switchgear and displayed clearly on the TFT screen for easy rider interaction while riding.

Also, two rider modes are available, Road and Rain, which adjust the throttle response and traction control settings, improving rider control for greater confidence in all riding conditions. Safety is further enhanced with ABS and switchable traction control, both fitted as standard on the Tiger Sport 660. Traction control can be turned off completely, via the instruments, if desired.



The Tiger Sport 660 is equipped with a slip-and-assist clutch and a span-adjustable clutch lever for light and easy operation, reducing rider fatigue, particularly in urban riding. Lighting is LED across the entire motorcycle, including the distinctive new twin headlights, the compact and integrated tail-light, and the self-cancelling indicators.



As well as having a low price tag starting at $14,690 ride away, the new Tiger Sport 660 benefits from the lowest cost of ownership in the category. This includes its 16,000km (or 12 months) service interval plus its two-year unlimited mileage warranty, which can be optionally extended by one or two years. The Tiger Sport 660 will be available in the first quarter of 2022 and will only be available in LAMs trim for Australian customers.


RatedR Parts
 

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Specifications

triumphmotorcycles.com.au

Price: From $14,690 R/A
Warranty: Two Years Unlimited KM
Colours: Lucerne Blue and Sapphire Black, Red and Graphite, Graphite and Black.
Claimed Power: 35kW@8750rpm
Claimed Torque: 59Nm@5,250rpm


ENGINE
Liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, inline three-cylinder four-stroke, 660cc, bore x stroke 74mm x 51.1mm, compression ratio 11.95:1, EFI Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection with electronic throttle control, Stainless steel 3 into 1 header system with low single stainless steel silencer, wet, multi-plate clutch, six-speed gearbox.


CHASSIS
Frame Type; Tubular steel perimeter frame
Rake: 23.1º Trail: 97.1mm
Suspension: Showa 41mm upside down separate function cartridge forks, 150mm wheel travel (f), Showa monoshock RSU, with remote hydraulic preload adjustment, 150mm wheel travel (r).
Brakes: Nissin two-piston sliding calipers, twin 310mm discs, ABS (f) Nissin single-piston sliding caliper, single 255mm disc, ABS (r).
Wheels & Tyres: Cast alloy, 17in Michelin Road 5 Tyres


DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: 1418mm
Overall Length: 2071mm
Width: 834mm
Height: 1398mm / 1315mm (high / low screen position)
Seat Height: 835mm
Wet Weight: 206kg
Fuel Capacity: 17.2L


Dash & Electronics: TFT Screen with smart phone connectivity, traction control, ride modes, Bluetooth connectivity, My Triumph connectibity app available for Nav, Music and more.


Shannons Q2 24
 

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